I Hope Rhys Is Looking Down and Knows We've Given Him Wee Brother He Wanted; HEARTACHE & JOY FAMILY'S IVF STRUGGLE AFTER DEATH OF SON Kelly and Albert Had Second Child at 4th and Final Attempt after Tragedy of Losing Tot to Leukaemia

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), April 9, 2016 | Go to article overview

I Hope Rhys Is Looking Down and Knows We've Given Him Wee Brother He Wanted; HEARTACHE & JOY FAMILY'S IVF STRUGGLE AFTER DEATH OF SON Kelly and Albert Had Second Child at 4th and Final Attempt after Tragedy of Losing Tot to Leukaemia


Byline: MARIA CROCE maria.croce@trinitymirror.com

KELLY Norrie smiles as she cuddles her gorgeous boy Aaron. Having feared that she might never be a mum again after losing her first son, she cherishes every moment with the three-year-old.

Rhys was three when he lost an 18-month battle with leukaemia in April 2010. Kelly and her partner Albert Webster had struggled to have children and he was a miracle baby conceived through IVF.

The couple had promised Rhys they'd try to give him a brother or sister. After he died, they went through three unsuccessful cycles of IVF before Kelly finally fell pregnant with Aaron on the fourth attempt, which they'd decided would be their last.

She is convinced her little angel in heaven played a part in bringing them Aaron, who bears a striking resemblance to his lost brother.

Kelly said: "I'd like to think Rhys was there somewhere helping along the way.

"Having Aaron doesn't take away the loss of Rhys but it was a promise we wanted to keep for him and I hope he's looking down and thinking we did give him the brother he wanted.

"I feel Rhys around me all the time, it's like he's never far away."

Kelly, of Mastrick, Aberdeen, is backing Cancer Research UK's Race for Life events, which are taking place all over Scotland this summer.

Part of the money raised will be used to research new cancer treatments tailored to young children and teens.

Kelly said: "To see a little one going through such difficult treatment is so hard. It's vital that we raise as much money for research into new drugs and techniques to help families who are in the position we were in.

"Signing up for Race for Life can make a huge difference and I'd urge anyone thinking about it to commit."

Life changed overnight for full-time mum Kelly, 37, and oil industry inspector Albert, 45, when Rhys was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in August 2008.

He'd been poorly since a bout of chicken pox, then suffered throat infections and developed a rash.

Tests at Aberdeen's Royal Children's Hospital revealed the shock news. Every year about 8600 people are diagnosed with leukaemia in the UK. Some 650 of them will have acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and half will be children.

Some of the most common symptoms include pale skin, feeling tired and breathless, bone or joint pain and having repeated infections. Clinical trials funded by Cancer Research UK are vital in developing treatments for the disease.

Rhys battled through chemotherapy, radiotherapy, a bone marrow transplant and 42 blood transfusions. When he suffered a relapse in March 2010, doctors said there was nothing more they could do.

He passed away peacefully in the arms of his mum and dad on April 9, 2010, three months after his third birthday.

Kelly said: "Albert and I didn't tell him he was dying - how do you explain that to a three-year-old? We just sat by his bed and talked to him the way we always did and held his hand as he fell asleep for the last time. …

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I Hope Rhys Is Looking Down and Knows We've Given Him Wee Brother He Wanted; HEARTACHE & JOY FAMILY'S IVF STRUGGLE AFTER DEATH OF SON Kelly and Albert Had Second Child at 4th and Final Attempt after Tragedy of Losing Tot to Leukaemia
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