Celebrate More Victories

By Dorsey, Jason Ryan | Success, February 2013 | Go to article overview

Celebrate More Victories


Dorsey, Jason Ryan, Success


The secret? Think small.

There is nothing like setting big goals on New Year's Eve. You're celebrating with old friends--or 100,000 strangers on TV. Brightly colored fireworks pop in the air. White confetti dances with gravity. Adrenaline races through your body. So you dream. You dream big. You reach for the nearest piece of paper and boldly write your 2013 goals:

* Goal 1: e stubborn 20 pounds.

* Goal 2: my income with less work.

* Goal 3: Learn to speak a new language.

Now fast-forward. The confetti is gone. The pounds are still here. Thanks to the holidays, you have more outgo than income. You even settled on text messaging as your new foreign language. What happened? Life did. But maybe not in the way you think.

It's not that you're simply busier. You have always had lots to do. It's not that you're suddenly less intelligent. In fact, you have J more life experience now than when you set your goals. The truth is that when you give up on big goals early, it's likely your goals were simply too big in the first place.

Now hold on a minute.

Before you say I've lost my mind or that "Jason Dorsey must no longer be a motivational speaker," hear me out. Big goals are good. In fact, they're great. I get it. But most people never reach their biggest goals because they can't stick to them in the beginning. That's the part I'm talking about: the all-important first 30 or 60 days. That's the period when the magic happens. That is when you put in the hard work to get to a new or different result. In fact, you have to put in twice the work in the beginning, because you're starting a new habit and breaking an old one at the same time. This is where I can help.

In my work with leaders around the world, I've learned a powerful truth: Old habits are the enemies of new goals. For example, getting in shape sounds great until you nearly pass out in your first Zumba class. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Celebrate More Victories
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.