Care Services for Elderly People with Dementia in Rural China: A Case Study/ Services Proposes Aux Personnes Agees Atteintes De Demence Dans la Chine Rurale: Une Etude De cas/Servicios De Atencion Para Personas Mayores Con Demencia En la China Rural: Un Estudio De Casos

By Wu, Christina; Gao, Lin et al. | Bulletin of the World Health Organization, March 2016 | Go to article overview

Care Services for Elderly People with Dementia in Rural China: A Case Study/ Services Proposes Aux Personnes Agees Atteintes De Demence Dans la Chine Rurale: Une Etude De cas/Servicios De Atencion Para Personas Mayores Con Demencia En la China Rural: Un Estudio De Casos


Wu, Christina, Gao, Lin, Chen, Shulin, Dong, Hengjin, Bulletin of the World Health Organization


Introduction

In China, the longevity of the inhabitants and the prevalence of conditions associated with ageing are increasing. Between 2010 and 2040, the proportion of the population that is 65 years or older is expected to more than double from 9.0% to 22.6%. (1) Since the 1980s, family-planning policies and a decline in births have led to reductions in the number of working-age people. (2) The old-age dependency ratio--i.e. the number of people that are 65 years or older per 100 people aged 20 to 64 years--is expected to increase from 13 in 2010 to 45 in 2050. (3)

The global number of people with dementia--i.e. degenerative brain diseases characterized by the progressive loss or decline of memory and other cognitive abilities--is increasing in most countries. (4) In 2014, the prevalence of dementia in China was estimated--from five representative centres--to be 5.1% (528/10276) and 23.3% (96/412) among individuals older than 64 years and 84 years, respectively. (5) The estimated number of people with dementia increased from 3.68 million in 1990 to 9.19 million in 2010. (6) The condition not only reduces the earnings of the people with dementia and/or their families--by an estimated mean of 1159 yuan ([yen]) or about 183 United States dollars (US$) per month per person with dementia--but also adds an estimated 51.3 [yen]-59.8 billion to the national health-care costs annually. (7)

The care and support of the elderly is traditionally a familial responsibility. (8) As a result, admission to facilities for the care of the elderly--which was highly stigmatized--has generally been restricted to individuals who were unable to work and did not have a source of income or any legal guardians. Until recently, the government has not provided further options for the care of the elderly. (3)

Demographic shifts and socioeconomic changes are now weakening the tradition of familial care of the elderly. In cities, the family structure often consists of four grandparents, two parents and one child. (9) Many elderly people are choosing to live separately from their adult children (10) and migration of young workers to urban areas and historical shifts in a family's welfare function have eroded family tradition in many rural settings. (11) Faced with these trends, the government aims to establish three tiers of services for the elderly: (i) home-based care as the basis; (ii) community-based services as support; and (iii) institutional care as the last resort. However, the home- and community-based services that are available are limited. (3) Although policy inducements have promoted the development of institutions for the care of the elderly (3) and institutional care appears to have become more acceptable to the elderly and their adult children, (12) the capacity to provide such care lags behind the need. Institutions for the care of the elderly rarely have clinical staff and most of their employees are rural migratory workers, (1,13) who lack the training needed to manage the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. (13,14) In consequence, many institutions simply refuse to admit anyone with dementia or, at least, advanced dementia. A study in Chengdu found that of the 10 institutions that they investigated, five rejected people with advanced dementia. (13) Home- and community-based dementia-specific services--e.g. day-care, respite, caregiver support and case management--only exist in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Taiwan and a few major urban centres. (15)

One result of the general scarcity of dementia-specific services (16) is that little is known about the care of people with dementia in medical, institutional and community-based settings in China. The main aim of the present study was to use information collected in interviews in Lanxi county, to determine the current state of the health and supportive services available to elderly people with dementia--and their families--in rural areas. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Care Services for Elderly People with Dementia in Rural China: A Case Study/ Services Proposes Aux Personnes Agees Atteintes De Demence Dans la Chine Rurale: Une Etude De cas/Servicios De Atencion Para Personas Mayores Con Demencia En la China Rural: Un Estudio De Casos
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.