Alleged Victim: 'I Was Molested by My Running Coach'

The Journal (Newcastle, England), May 4, 2016 | Go to article overview

Alleged Victim: 'I Was Molested by My Running Coach'


Byline: Katie Dickinson Reporter katie.dickinson@trinitymirror.com

THE heir to the Greggs bakery fortune allegedly molested a young boy while he worked as a running coach, a court has heard Former head teacher Colin Gregg is on trial at Newcastle Crown Court accused of allegedly carrying out indecent assaults on nine children, aged between 11 and 15, between the 1960s and 1990s, some of them during the course of his employment. The 74-year-old, of Homefarm Steading, Gosforth, worked as a head teacher in Tynemouth, as well as teaching at Talbout House school, Durham School, and he also worked as a social worker for Newcastle City Council besides acting as a sports coach.

Newcastle Crown Court heard how the man, now in his 30s, was around 10 years old the first time he was inappropriately touched by the former head teacher.

The alleged abuse took place for around a year when the complainant took part in cross country running.

The runs would start and finish at Gregg's house at the time, on Linden Road in Gosforth. The man, who can not be identified for legal reasons, told the jury there was a routine of stretching exercises before and after each run. He said: "I would lie on the bench with one leg flat and the other one on Colin Gregg's shoulder.

"He would then apply pressure to the leg that he'd lifted up.

"He would move his hand so it was over my crotch and there were times I remember he put his hands up my shorts and did stuff to me.

"The time I remember most was when he went too far and hurt me. I yelled and then he let go."

The man said he couldn't remember how many times such incidents occurred, and said he didn't realise what had happened to him until several years later. …

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