Eating Crow at the Antebellum Inn

The RMA Journal, May 2016 | Go to article overview

Eating Crow at the Antebellum Inn


The loan officer in this story learned some painful lessons when he financed the restoring of a grand estate for conversion into a Civil War-period restaurant. Despite the restaurant's initial success, it was soon battling financial problems.

When the borrower later beat a hasty retreat to his home state up north, he left the establishment in the hands of an incapable lieutenant and the restaurant eventually succumbed to defeat.

ONCE THERE WAS a dignified residence with a history that predated the Civil War. It was located next to a small pond and, nearby, a state highway wended its way further into the Deep South.

The residence had fallen into disrepair and disgrace. The tall columns that adorned the front had collapsed, the roof was in shambles, the paint had long since chipped and peeled, and the once beautiful gardens were choked with weeds.

Only a true visionary could see the beautiful swan beneath this ugly duckling.

Enter: The Visionary

One day, just such a visionary appeared: Carl Capital from faraway New Jersey. Capital was driving along the interstate on business. He spotted the residence, and immediately an idea sprang to mind: He would refurbish the house and make it an upscale restaurant.

Capital did some investigating and found that the building was, indeed, for sale. He then went to the local bank, Hearth and Home Trust, for financing.

The Request and Subsequent Approval

At the bank, Capital explained to the loan officer, Barry Balance Sheet, that he needed funds both to buy and to restore the building. 'I've even got a name for the place: the Antebellum Inn," Capital said with excitement. "I envision patrons seated in the luxurious dining room, overlooking that charming pond I described. I also intend to have the staff dress in Civil War-period costumes."

Balance Sheet dug a bit further. "What makes you think it would be a good restaurant?" he asked.

Capital replied: "A couple of things: One, the building has the potential to be beautiful. If I restore it to its former glory, it's sure to be a sensation as a restaurant.

"Number two is the close proximity of the highway. Consider this: I saw the site from the interstate, which means that other drivers will see it too. If I ensure that the inn has an attractive front, patrons are sure to stop. And I will light up the inn at night, thereby bringing in more trade.

"In addition, the highway will ensure easy access. It will be simple for diners to arrive and depart."

Balance Sheet agreed to consider the request and told Capital that he would have an answer in a few days.

When the potential borrower had left, the loan officer considered the application. Capital could support the debt service from his primary business, but no business plan or projections for the restaurant accompanied the financial statements. Capital claimed that this idea was "red hot" and that he wanted to get moving on it right away. There was no time to gather that data, he said.

Despite these drawbacks, Balance Sheet decided that Capital represented a creditworthy borrower and he extended the funds.

The Gala Opening

Almost a year later, the Antebellum Inn celebrated its gala opening. Balance Sheet and his wife were invited, and when they arrived they were amazed. The estate had been completely restored: Magnolia trees and bougainvillea plants added a sweet aroma to the front garden, which was a carpet of lush, green grass. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Eating Crow at the Antebellum Inn
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.