Why Women's Colleges Are Still Needed: Helping Women Learn Their Strengths Will Lead to Financial and Political Equal

By Allen, Jo | University Business, May 2016 | Go to article overview

Why Women's Colleges Are Still Needed: Helping Women Learn Their Strengths Will Lead to Financial and Political Equal


Allen, Jo, University Business


Meredith College, celebrating its 125th anniversary, recently adopted a new brand--"Going Strong"--that reflects its reputation, enrollment and financial strength. While Meredith's fundraising and application rate are the highest in our history, several other women's colleges have recently either gone coed or closed.

Questioning the relevance of women's colleges is a bit obvious--and not so easy to answer without becoming defensive about the ways the world continues to devalue women. In the U.S., we still earn less than men (78 cents to a man's dollar), are still significantly underrepresented in the board rooms and executive suites of top corporations, and hold substantially fewer elected positions than men.

The role of women's colleges--far beyond their origins in offering access to college degrees--is to help women flourish. Some women's colleges have focused on women's leadership; some on career preparation in STEM and other areas where women have been underrepresented and dissatisfied; and still others on health care, education and areas where women excel.

Powerful women plan

Meredith has gone a different route, while still encouraging the aspects of development that we know help women succeed. Meredith's faculty and staff--grounded in explorations and research in positive education, appreciative inquiry and strengths building--have created StrongPoints. It's an individualized advising/coaching model that helps each student use her strengths in academic, experiential, financial and career planning to build her best college experience.

Just as important is that students learn that, beyond college, planning is a significant skill in building a good life. And our institutional leaders have adopted that same approach in using the strengths of the college to build its strategic plan for the future. It's dynamic both for our students and our college, and reinforces our relevance and success.

When each woman learns her strengths and explores how they might open opportunities for her future, she learns that she is, in fact, quite powerful. For Meredith students, "empowerment of women" is now a concrete term tied to planning and follow-through. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Why Women's Colleges Are Still Needed: Helping Women Learn Their Strengths Will Lead to Financial and Political Equal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.