Gluten-Free Goodness; Gluten-Free Choices Are Getting Better - but There's Still a Way to Go, Says Phil Vickery. the TV Chef Tells KATE WHITING Why He's on a Mission to Make Free-From Cooking Mainstream

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), May 14, 2016 | Go to article overview

Gluten-Free Goodness; Gluten-Free Choices Are Getting Better - but There's Still a Way to Go, Says Phil Vickery. the TV Chef Tells KATE WHITING Why He's on a Mission to Make Free-From Cooking Mainstream


COELIAC disease is not new - the word itself is a translation of the Greek 'koiliakos' meaning 'abdominal', and linked to ancient Greek physician, Aretaeus of Cappadocia. But it's only in the last decade that modern-day supermarkets have caught up and started catering to those with the autoimmune illness, which affects around 1% of the UK population.

A disease - rather than an allergy or intolerance - when people with coeliac eat gluten, their immune system mistakes it as a threat and attacks healthy tissues. Symptoms include bloating, diarrhoea, nausea, wind, constipation, tiredness, anaemia and sudden or unexpected weight loss - which can be very similar to symptoms caused by an intolerance.

However, with coeliac, cutting out gluten completely is absolutely essential for avoiding, possibly serious, long-term damage and complications.

Coeliac UK notes that up to half a million people are believed to be living with coeliac disease undiagnosed, and it can take up to 13 years for a diagnosis.

It's no wonder the free-from sections are starting to take up more of the supermarket aisles, and brands like PizzaExpress, Young's Fish Fingers and Nestle Cereals are all introducing gluten-free alternatives into their product ranges.

Mintel research reckons the free-from market is worth around PS365 million, and predicts it will grow another 50% by 2019.

One man who has watched the free-from rise with interest is Coeliac UK ambassador and TV chef Phil Vickery. He published his first gluten-free cookbook, Seriously Good! Gluten-free Cooking in 2009 - which has sold more than 250,000 copies to date, with a revised edition out this year - and his latest, Phil Vickery's Essential Gluten-free, came out this week.

The This Morning regular and his family - wife Fern Britton and four children (the couple have one daughter together, and three are from Britton's first marriage) - don't have any need to stick to a gluten-free diet at home. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Gluten-Free Goodness; Gluten-Free Choices Are Getting Better - but There's Still a Way to Go, Says Phil Vickery. the TV Chef Tells KATE WHITING Why He's on a Mission to Make Free-From Cooking Mainstream
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.