Women in Banking: Pam Joseph Returns; #TheNew10 for Canada

By Macheel, Tanaya | American Banker, March 11, 2016 | Go to article overview

Women in Banking: Pam Joseph Returns; #TheNew10 for Canada


Macheel, Tanaya, American Banker


Byline: Tanaya Macheel

#TheNew10, Canada Edition: The Bank of Canada will soon begin accepting nominations for an "iconic" woman to feature on a new bank note to be distributed in 2018. "With this new note, we can honor the achievements of Canadian women and inspire future generations to learn more about the significant contributions women have made to our country," the central bank governor, Stephen Poloz, said. Nominees must be Canadian by birth or naturalization, deceased for at least 25 years and not fictional. The nomination process will launch April 15.

C-U-Later: Debbie Matz, who has chaired the board of the National Credit Union Administration since August 2009, will step down at the end of April. She served 11 years at the NCUA, which is the regulatory agency overseeing credit unions.

Higher R-O-ETF: State Street Global Advisors has launched an exchange-traded fund that tracks companies with high levels of women in senior leadership positions. The ETF began trading this week under the ticker "SHE." It is the latest example of a trend in which asset managers are seeking to bring social causes to their U.S. investment strategies. "SHE seeks to help address gender inequality in corporate America by offering investors an opportunity to create change with capital and seek a return on gender diversity," says Kristi Mitchem, head of the Americas Institutional Client Group for State Street Global Advisors. (You may recall that Barbara Byrne worked on the launch of a similar investment option at Barclays.)

No More Arguments: More women-owned businesses mean more board opportunities are coming for women, argues Carla Harris, vice chairman of global wealth management at Morgan Stanley. Data from the National Women's Business Council -- an organization Harris chairs -- shows there are now 10 million U.S. women-owned businesses generating a total of $1.4 trillion in revenue and employing 8 million people. This is "a clear tipping point," Harris said in a Bloomberg video interview that partly focused on the gender gap on corporate boards. Harris said boards will find it harder to overlook female candidates with so many coming to the table as experienced business owners. Arguments that women lack the operational expertise boards seek will become "defunct." Finally, "those who don't get it will hug the data," which shows that companies with diverse boards outperform their peers.

Rising Through the Ranks?: Mercer research shows women make up 76% of support staff in the financial services industry. That figure shrinks to 44% of mid-level managers, 30% of senior managers and 21% of executives. Mercer surveyed 583 companies, with a total of 3.2 million employees across 42 countries.

Don't Wait: Some say women's lesser status on Wall Street has improved since the pre-crisis dark days, but not Sallie Krawcheck. Is it worth waiting for, though? The CEO of the forthcoming women's investment platform Ellevest said that the industry pipeline of women at junior levels now is the same as when she started working a couple decades ago -- and the lack of women at higher levels is about the same too. She said one problem is that inherent biases (like managers wanting to promote someone similar to themselves) still exist, despite research showing gender-diverse teams outperform others. Krawcheck pointed out that it's less costly than ever to be an entrepreneur (try crowdfunding!) and that women have greater opportunities to make change instead of waiting for it.

Change Will Take a Generation: Asia is witnessing the rise of women in corporations and in politics, Jing Ulrich, JPMorgan Chase managing director and vice chairman of Asia Pacific, said in a video interview. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Women in Banking: Pam Joseph Returns; #TheNew10 for Canada
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.