Over to EU: Cameron Answers Your Brexit Questions. David Cameron Has Answered Questions Put to Him by WalesOnline Readers as the Country Faces the Challenge of Deciding Whether or Not to Stay in the European Union. You Asked Him about the Future of the Steel Industry, the Threat of War, the Democratic Accountability of the EU and Whether He'll Stay on as PM If the Country Votes to Leave. This Is What He Had to Say

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 25, 2016 | Go to article overview

Over to EU: Cameron Answers Your Brexit Questions. David Cameron Has Answered Questions Put to Him by WalesOnline Readers as the Country Faces the Challenge of Deciding Whether or Not to Stay in the European Union. You Asked Him about the Future of the Steel Industry, the Threat of War, the Democratic Accountability of the EU and Whether He'll Stay on as PM If the Country Votes to Leave. This Is What He Had to Say


Lynne Fitter, from Aberystwyth: Given that Wales languishes as one of Europe's poorest countries and is in receipt of necessary funding from Europe, where will that money come from if the UK votes out? | David Cameron: This is a good question - and it's really one for the Leave Campaign to answer. There has been PS1.8bn set aside for Wales in the European budget between 2014 and 2020. This cash is vital for economic development and important projects in the area.

Were we to leave, our economy would suffer a profound shock.

In those circumstances, of course, the government would always do everything it could for all the different parts of the country, but you can't guarantee these things because we could find ourselves in quite dif-ficult economic circumstances.

It is simply not a risk worth taking for Wales.

Jamie Thomas, from Port Talbot: How can you blame the EU rules for failing to help our steel industry when Germany publicly subsidises its heavy industry to the tune of 40 times what you have given ours? | DC: Wales' steel industry is vital to the whole country. That's why we are doing everything we can to help secure a long-term and viable future for it, including by working closely with Tata so it can find a buyer for its UK operations.

And a long-term future means profitability and success, not simply the short-term quick fix of being propped up with public subsidies.

But we need to be clear - this is not a crisis that is solely affecting Britain.

There's an overproduction of steel of around 35% across the world and the price of some types of steel almost halved in 2014.

This has contributed to dozens of plant closures across Europe since 2008 and the steel manufacturing workforce has fallen by about 70,000.

Hiding away and turning our backs on Europe is not the answer for industries like steel.

We need to set new trade standards and find a global solution to overproduction, as the industry is dealing with extreme global economic conditions.

As part of a reformed EU we will have a place around the negotiating table to help set high standards and protect British interests.

Stephen Williams, from Tonyrefail: Why do you want to stay in an undemocratic union where we do not know who makes the laws that affect our lives and we have no vote to change who they are? | DC: I understand why people are frustrated with the EU and our task of reforming it must continue.

Today we have a powerful place at the negotiating table and a full say over the rules of doing business across the continent.

If Britain were to leave we'd have an illusion of sovereignty but we wouldn't actually be more in control of our destiny.

We'd be left with far less influence, losing the power to make sure businesses aren't discriminated against in Europe and to set the rules of trade.

The deal I negotiated in February means we have carved Britain out of "ever closer union" for good.

We've also already passed a Referendum Act to make sure that no fur-ther powers can be handed to Brussels without the explicit consent of the British people in a ref-f erendum.

So a vote to remain is a vote for the best of both worlds - staying in a Europe that helps our economy and helps keep us safe, but staying out of the parts of Europe that don't work for us.

George Atkinson, from Bwcle: Is it fair that if Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland vote to stay in and England votes us out, that we all get dragged out on a vote of another country with different political values to us? | DC: We are one United Kingdom and the vote of the British people as a whole will determine whether we stay in a reformed EU or leave.

I hope there is a clear view in every part of our country that we are stronger, safer and better-off inside this organisation - and that leaving is a risk we mustn't take. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Over to EU: Cameron Answers Your Brexit Questions. David Cameron Has Answered Questions Put to Him by WalesOnline Readers as the Country Faces the Challenge of Deciding Whether or Not to Stay in the European Union. You Asked Him about the Future of the Steel Industry, the Threat of War, the Democratic Accountability of the EU and Whether He'll Stay on as PM If the Country Votes to Leave. This Is What He Had to Say
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.