Measure for Pleasure: Sex, Money and Shakespeare

By Bate, Jonathan | New Statesman (1996), April 29, 2016 | Go to article overview

Measure for Pleasure: Sex, Money and Shakespeare


Bate, Jonathan, New Statesman (1996)


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Sex With Shakespeare: Here's Much to Do With Pain, But More With Love

Jillian Keenan

William Morrow, 552pp. $25.99

Shakespeare's Money: How Much Did He Make and What Did This Mean?

Robert Bearman

Oxford University Press, 196pp. 30 [pounds sterling]

A hundred years ago this month, preparations for the Battle of the Somme were no impediment to national remembrance of the tercentenary of William Shakespeare's death. He had been buried on 25 April 1616, but it was generally agreed that he had died two days earlier, on what may well have been his 52nd birthday (we can be sure about the date of his baptism in 1564, but not that of his birth). So, on 23 April 1916, St George's Day, celebrations were staged in Stratford-upon-Avon and London. Also in Prague and Madrid, New York and Copenhagen. And, with special fervour, in Berlin. Back in the 18th century Goethe and Schiller had claimed Shakespeare as Germany's national poet. In their adopted town of Weimar, as Germany geared up for war in 1914, the president of the Deutsche Shakespeare-Gesellschaft (German Shakespeare Society) had aligned Shakespeare to the spiritual rearmament of the German people. "O God of battles!" he had declaimed from Henry V, "steel my soldiers' hearts;/Possess them not with fear".

The two most notable Shakespearean publications of that tercentenary year were both published by Oxford University Press. First there was a stout, two -volume set called Shakespeare's England: an Account of the Life and Manners of His Age. It began with an Ode on the Tercentenary Commemoration of Shakespeare" by Robert Bridges, the poet laureate. "And in thy book Great-Britain's rule readeth her right," Bridges wrote. "Her chains are chains of Freedom, and her bright arms/Honour, Justice and Truth and Love to man." Thanks to Shakespeare--the poem proposed--the Union Jack has been hailed around the world as "the ensign of Liberty". Shakespeare was lauded as the vessel of a kind of benign gunboat diplomacy: "And the boom of her guns went round the earth in salvos of peace."

The book proceeded with a paean to "The Age of Elizabeth" by the aptly named Sir Walter Raleigh, Merton professor of English literature at Oxford, and then with an array of essays on almost every aspect of the culture of Shakespeare's age, from religion, the military, education, travel and agriculture to law and medicine, commerce and coinage, heraldry and costume, city and town life, homes and gardens, sports and pastimes, rogues and vagabonds, and ghosts and witches. A century later, Shakespeare's England remains a valuable compendium of historical lore, though it does not have much to say about the subjects that most 21st-century academic Shakespeareans focus on--women and gender, race and ethnicity, questions of cultural ecology and social anthropology.

The other OUP volume of 1916 was entitled A Book of Homage to Shakespeare. It contained over 160 tributes to the Bard, in more than 20 languages, contributed by scholars and writers from every corner of the globe. As Andrew Dickson reveals in his wonderful Shakespearean travelogue, Worlds Elsewhere, published last autumn, there is even an essay (written anonymously) by Sol Plaatje, the founding general secretary of what became the African National Congress, arguing that William "TsikinyaChaka" (that's "Shake-the-Sword", translated into Setswana) would one day belong to all South Africans, not just white men.

In contrast to the impassioned celebrations and the hyperbole of the claims about Shakespeare in 1916, the marking of the 400th anniversary of his birth in 1964 was fairly low-key. There was a set of Royal Mail stamps, a spike in academic publications, a ramping up of the annual Stratford-upon-Avon birthday jamboree, and not much more.

The two most notable books on Shakespeare published that year were modest in scale compared to the hefty tomes of a half-century earlier--though not modest in ambition. …

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