I Thought I Was Curvy. Apparently I'm Obese; Minister for Health Promotion Speaks Out

Daily Mail (London), June 2, 2016 | Go to article overview

I Thought I Was Curvy. Apparently I'm Obese; Minister for Health Promotion Speaks Out


Byline: Senan Molony Political Editor

THE new Minister of State for health promotion has described herself as obese.

Newly promoted Marcella Corcoran Kennedy, 52, bravely raised the issue of her weight when speaking on future health strategy in the Dail.

The Fine Gael TD, who represents Offaly, told the Dail chamber: 'I used to think I was curvaceous but now I'm told I'm actually obese. So I had better do something about it.' She said it was a sad fact that one in four Irish children was obese, while more than half of all adults were overweight.

The mother of two, first elected in 2011, said: 'Obesity is an issue of great concern. I am conscious of it as a parent having reared children and I also see the high incidence of it among young people.

'Unfortunately, one in four of our children and around 60% of the population are obese.

'I will have to look into my heart on this one. I always thought I was curvaceous but have been told I am obese, so I better do something about it. We are getting older and we need to maintain our cardiovascular health and try to resist developing conditions that will leave us prone to having a stroke, a heart attack or developing cancer.

Later, speaking on mental health, Ms Corcoran Kennedy spoke honestly about the pressures of being in the public eye - and said her life had been threatened online during the election campaign.

'We should be careful with one another also. We have to mind our own mental health. I find dealing with social media very challenging.

The negativity, vilification and viciousness tossed at public representatives as if they were figures of stone - as if they did not feel the same as everybody else and did not have a family the same as everybody else,' she said. 'During the general election campaign, I gave up looking at social media altogether. It is hard to believe but my life was actually threatened on social media.

'I do not believe the person who threatened my life had any intention of carrying anything out, but at the same time it was not very nice to believe there was a man somewhere in the county who felt the world would be a better place without me.' The minister said the person who made the threat had stated 'that he would be prepared to do time if I were removed from the world'. …

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