How a Digital Bubble Could Protect Your Kids Online; Can a Secure Social Network, Designed for Six to 12-Year-Olds, Stem the Tide of Kids Using Facebook Underage? ALEX MAJEWSKI Finds Out

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), June 10, 2016 | Go to article overview

How a Digital Bubble Could Protect Your Kids Online; Can a Secure Social Network, Designed for Six to 12-Year-Olds, Stem the Tide of Kids Using Facebook Underage? ALEX MAJEWSKI Finds Out


Byline: ALEX MAJEWSKI

IF YOU 'VE got a child and an internet connection, it probably won't surprise you to learn that web usage in youngsters is at an all-time high.

Recent research from the Office of National Statistics shows that 89% of eight to 11-year-olds are active online every day or nearly every day, so ensuring your children stay safe on the net is more important than ever.

One of the areas causing the most strife is how to approach the use of social media: while platforms such as Facebook have a minimum age limit of 13, a recent poll found that 59% of children were using social media sites by the age of 10.

ever-present moderators won't need close an eye That's where eCadets comes in. The start-up, founded in 2014, aims to make social media safe for kids, by providing a secure network where grown-ups are the ones that are banned.

Called Bubble, the network connects users of the same academic year group from around the world to ensure children are speaking to other kids their own age. Currently only accessible via school computers, the eCadets mean parents keep quite as on their kids platform is set to expand into community and sports groups, and other organisations committed to educational technology.

The company recently won the Best Innovation category at the Internet Matters Digital Safety Awards and is growing rapidly: after a 1,000% licensing increase from 2015 to 2016, Bubble will soon be accessible for more than 1. …

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