Implosion of the Never, Never, Never Trump Neocons: After Extracting a Pledge from Trump Not to Bolt the GOP for a Third-Party Insurgency, Neoconservative Icons Are Advocating a Third-Party Candidate

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, June 6, 2016 | Go to article overview

Implosion of the Never, Never, Never Trump Neocons: After Extracting a Pledge from Trump Not to Bolt the GOP for a Third-Party Insurgency, Neoconservative Icons Are Advocating a Third-Party Candidate


Jasper, William F., The New American


"No, not Trump, not ever."

--David Brooks, New York Times

"I'm with her [Hillary]."

--Mark Salter, speechwriter/author

"Neither Clinton Nor Trump."

--William Kristol, Weekly Standard

"It's possible."

--GOP billionaire Charles Koch (on choosing Clinton over Trump)

"Never Means Never."

--Ben Shapiro, dailywire.com

Never means NEVER! Charles Krauthammer, William Kristol, Rich Lowry, Jonah Goldberg, Mary Matalin, and other assorted neoconservative talking heads that populate the pages of National Review, the Weekly Standard, and the Wall Street Journal, and that regularly hold forth on Fox News, are in a jam. So is House Speaker Paul Ryan, darling of the neocon set, along with most of the Republican Party establishment. Donald Trump's May 3 primary victory in Indiana put them there. Or more accurately, their "Stop Trump--at all costs" obsession has put them there.

After relentlessly hammering Trump on the necessity for party unity, and after extracting a pledge from him not to bolt the GOP for a third-party insurgency should he lose the nomination, the neoconservative icons are doing precisely that: bolting the party. Some of the GOP's establishment pundits and politicos are so anti-Trump they'd rather help Hillary Clinton take the White House.

The #NeverTrump naysayers are imploding --in several directions. The most extreme anti-Trumpers are saying they'll switch parties and vote for Hillary. Others are trying to field Republican candidates to launch a third-party ticket. Other Never Trumpers say they'll cross over to the Libertarian Party, which already has a national organization and ballot status in all 50 states. Still others are advocating staying in the GOP but refusing to vote in the presidential race. All of these options defy their own unity pledge theme, of course, and also contribute toward another Clinton occupation, one that could complete the "transformation" of America envisioned by Barack Obama.

Donald Trump all but sewed up the Republican Party nomination with his overwhelming victory in the Indiana primary on May 3. With his last remaining GOP contenders, Ted Cruz and John Kasich, having now dropped out, Trump appears to be unstoppable--barring GOP Convention shenanigans by party leaders in Cleveland (for more on that, see our article on page 10). This has the Never Trump forces, who have been frothing at the mouth over "The Donald" for months, ready to take even more desperate measures.

In an interview with Bloomberg News on May 5, longtime Republican strategist and chattering-class maven Mary Matalin announced that she had left the Republican Party and, earlier that day, registered as a Libertarian.

In a follow-up interview on the Glenn Beck Radio Program on May 6, Matalin told Beck, "Everyone keeps saying that Trump hijacked the party. How about we left the keys in the car with the motor running? It's not a Jeffersonian, Madisonian representative republic--that's not what the party represents anymore." "I didn't leave it, it left me," Matalin added.

However, Matalin, who is perhaps best known for being married to Bill and Hillary Clinton hatchet man (and infamous TV ranter) James Carville, has for many years been supporting and defending the indefensible, as represented by Republican leaders in the White House and Congress.

In a May 6 column for Breitbart.com, Joel B. Poliak noted the lack of credibility in Matalin's moral outrage over Trump, especially after her defenses of GOP leaders such as former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay and fundraiser/lobbyist Jack Abramoff.

"Trump has his flaws," wrote Poliak, "and, if his worst critics are to be believed, he could be even worse than DeLay or Abramoff (from whom Matalin also defended the GOP on Meet the Press). But the idea that they are tolerable within the Republican Party, while Trump is somehow contaminating to everyone on the Republican voter rolls, is not credible. …

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