The Day When the Myth of a Pro-EUWALES Perished; Unlike Scotland, Wales Voted along the Same Lines as England and Embraced a Future in Which the UK Will No Longer Be Part of the European Union, Writes Political Editor David Williamson. A Time for Soul-Searching about the State of the Nation Now Awaits

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), June 25, 2016 | Go to article overview

The Day When the Myth of a Pro-EUWALES Perished; Unlike Scotland, Wales Voted along the Same Lines as England and Embraced a Future in Which the UK Will No Longer Be Part of the European Union, Writes Political Editor David Williamson. A Time for Soul-Searching about the State of the Nation Now Awaits


ONE of the most striking aspects of the Welsh referendum result is how closely it matches England's.

The 1888 edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica famously read: "For Wales, See England" - and something similar could be said about how the nation voted.

In Wales 52.5% of people backed Brexit - an only slightly smaller proportion than England's 53.4%.

This knocks on the head any suggestion that Wales is a radically less eurosceptic nation than England.

It also calls into question the extent to which Wales has a profoundly different political culture to England, especially when compared with how Scotland and Northern Ireland voted.

Strong majorities in Scotland (62%) and Northern Ireland (58.8%) backed remain.

In contrast, the only local authority areas in Wales where a majority of people wanted to stay in the EU were Cardiff, Ceredigion, Gwynedd, Monmouthshire and the Vale of Glamorgan.

The 60.02% pro-EU vote in Cardiff mirrors what happened in the UK capital, where 59.9% of Londoners voted to stay in the EU.

The Cardiff result is in line with that in other prosperous, multicultural urban centres in England. There was an almost identical vote in Manchester (60.4%).

Ceredigion and Gwynedd's emphatic votes to stay in the EU are more evidence that these areas have distinct political cultures.

In last year's Westminster election Ceredigion was the only area to send a Liberal Democrat representative to the Commons, and 54.63% of voters wanted to stay in the EU.

Gwynedd is traditionally seen as a Plaid Cymru heartland and 58.91% voted to remain.

The votes to remain were tighter in Monmouthshire (50.44%) and the Vale of Glamorgan (50.73%). Both seats have a reputation for prosperity and the economic argument for staying in may have made the difference.

Prosperous areas of the southwest of England also backed staying in, such as Cheltenham (56.2%) and Bristol (61.7%).

There will be deep soul-searching in Labour, Plaid, Lib Dem and pro-EU Tory circles as to why weeks of T determined campaigning for an In vote failed to deliver results in key areas.

The election of seven Ukip AMs last month was a sign that people were ready to vote for bold change. Yesterday was the latest shock for the parties that have held power in the years since 1999.

Swansea has a vibrant academic community and an ambitious financial services sector but 51. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Day When the Myth of a Pro-EUWALES Perished; Unlike Scotland, Wales Voted along the Same Lines as England and Embraced a Future in Which the UK Will No Longer Be Part of the European Union, Writes Political Editor David Williamson. A Time for Soul-Searching about the State of the Nation Now Awaits
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.