Charlotte Shows Spirit; Actress Relishes Chance to Play Loving Yet Independent Doctor's Wife Who Takes a Stoic and Practical Approach to the Supernatural When Events in an Isolated Somerset Community Take a Dark Turn in Victorian Period Drama

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), June 26, 2016 | Go to article overview

Charlotte Shows Spirit; Actress Relishes Chance to Play Loving Yet Independent Doctor's Wife Who Takes a Stoic and Practical Approach to the Supernatural When Events in an Isolated Somerset Community Take a Dark Turn in Victorian Period Drama


Byline: STEVE HENDRY

The last time Charlotte Spencer was on TV screens she was sporting a Scottish accent as a gangster's daughter in the adaptation of Iain Banks' Stonemouth.

In The Living and the Dead, she's got nothing so earthly to deal with, instead swapping small town hoods for Victorian period costume and the supernatural.

She returns to screens as Charlotte Appleby, wife of Colin Morgan's doctor Nathan.

The young couple return to his isolated family estate in Somerset in 1894 after inheriting the run-down farm.

Nathan is a pioneering London psychologist whose patients come to him as a result of the Victorian obsession with death and the afterlife.

Charlotte is his independent wife, a leading society photographer in London.

The actress said: "When you first see Charlotte and Nathan, the one thing you see is their love for each other.

"You immediately see that they are a team and are together in everything, including in all the decisions they make. They are fun and they love each other and it doesn't matter where they are, they are going to be fine because they are such a tight couple.

"Women back then had to conform, whereas Charlotte Appleby doesn't so much, she's a modern woman.

"There's a part of me that can relate to what she's going through when I'm playing her and she's just such a great character."

Things go well for the couple but then the parish vicar brings his troubled young daughter Harriet to see Nathan.

At first, Nathan from thinks she is just having a difficult journey into adulthood but she tells him things she couldn't possibly know, in voices she couldn't possibly ever have heard - those of the dead. …

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