After Karen Died, Her Family Told Me She Wasn't Really Homeless, and She "Liked a Lot of Boys"

By Gold, Tanya | New Statesman (1996), June 3, 2016 | Go to article overview

After Karen Died, Her Family Told Me She Wasn't Really Homeless, and She "Liked a Lot of Boys"


Gold, Tanya, New Statesman (1996)


I met Karen ten years ago. She was 21 years old tiny, pretty, a blonde. She lived under Waterloo Bridge with her boyfriend, Gareth. They were addicted to heroin. They were in love.

I don't know why Karen ran away from her home in north London. After she died, Gareth told me that she didn't like to talk about it. He knew her favourite colour (blue) and her favourite flower (cornflowers) but he did not know why she lived with him under Waterloo Bridge, like Terry and Julie.

They were fascinating: street lovers, a mascot for their homeless friends. Everyone in Charing Cross knew them. They were getting out.

I remember Karen because of the bodies on the streets. They aren't dead yet but they soon will be: the average age of a dead homeless woman was, in 2009,43; for a man, 47. David Cameron's beggar class is swelling before our eyes. It is only one of his legacies but it is the clearest indication of his indifference to suffering: the return of Gin Lane.

Street homelessness is life-threatening. Young women are sexually assaulted and propositioned; men are beaten, pissed on, set on fire. Gareth said that men often asked Karen ("a wee girl") to go home with them; that is why he didn't want her to beg on the streets. He begged for both of them.

One man took her home and locked her in his flat. She jumped out of the window and broke her ankles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

After Karen Died, Her Family Told Me She Wasn't Really Homeless, and She "Liked a Lot of Boys"
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.