Types of Colleges Liberal Arts Colleges Universities Community or Junior Colleges Upper Division Technical, Agricultural or Professional University Public vs. Private Special Interests Single-Gender Institutions Colleges Affiliated to a Religion Historical Black Colleges Hispanic-Serving Institution

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 26, 2016 | Go to article overview

Types of Colleges Liberal Arts Colleges Universities Community or Junior Colleges Upper Division Technical, Agricultural or Professional University Public vs. Private Special Interests Single-Gender Institutions Colleges Affiliated to a Religion Historical Black Colleges Hispanic-Serving Institution


(collegeboard) -- What kind of college would your child like? There are different types, each suitable for different people. Here is a list of the types of colleges to learn about the options available to students.

Liberal arts colleges offer extensive syllabuses of humanities, social sciences and science. Most are private and focus primarily on undergraduate students. Classes are generally smaller and personal attention is available.

Usually a "university" is larger than a "college" and offers more majors and research facilities. Class sizes usually reflect the size of the institution and some subjects can be taught by graduate students.

Community colleges offer a diploma after two years of full-time study. Usually they offer technical programs that prepare students for immediate entry into the labor market.

The "upper-division" universities offer the last two years of study, usually in specialized programs to obtain a degree. Generally, students are transferred to a higher division college after getting an associate degree or after finishing the second year in a four-year university.

Has your child made a clear decision about the career they want to follow after their studies? Specialized institutions seek to prepare students for specific careers such as art, music, Bible studies, business, health sciences, seminary, rabbi preparation or teaching.

On the one hand, public universities are often less expensive, especially for those residing in the same state where the college is because they receive money from state and local government. …

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Types of Colleges Liberal Arts Colleges Universities Community or Junior Colleges Upper Division Technical, Agricultural or Professional University Public vs. Private Special Interests Single-Gender Institutions Colleges Affiliated to a Religion Historical Black Colleges Hispanic-Serving Institution
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