How to Succeed at Floating: Learn How to Decrease Your Stress and Increase Your Job Satisfaction as a Floater

By Horvath, Kim | American Nurse Today, March 2016 | Go to article overview

How to Succeed at Floating: Learn How to Decrease Your Stress and Increase Your Job Satisfaction as a Floater


Horvath, Kim, American Nurse Today


IF YOU'VE EVER FLOATED, you know the experience can be challenging at times. Wherever you work, you may sometimes feel you don't have enough hours in the day to complete all your tasks, especially when working in clinical situations less familiar to you.

To float effectively and efficiently, you need to be skilled, knowledgeable, and competent. You have to stay current with new techniques and equipment, and be familiar with the policies and procedures of each facility where you work.

In many settings, floaters have opportunities to learn new skills. Once you've established key skills and gained the necessary knowledge, you can float to different departments with confidence and convey the message that you're a team player. What's more, gaining experience and skills in multiple settings can enhance your job security.

Floaters' de-stressing guide

Patients trust all nurses (floaters or not) to take good care of them. With this responsibility comes stress, which can impair your mental, emotional, and physical status.

Here are some strategies that can reduce your stress--and increase your success--as a floater:

1. Incorporate spirituality.

2. Be flexible.

3. Boost your knowledge base.

4. Continue your education.

5. Build your confidence.

6. Be humble.

7. Hone your communication skills.

Getting in touch with your spiritual side each morning and throughout the day can bring comfort and peace--not just to yourself but also to the patients you serve. Spiritual activity, such as prayer or meditation, can calm you and make you more compassionate. Remember--patients notice your countenance. Yours may be pleasant and calm, or miserable and uptight.

Spiritual practices can lead to a compassionate heart, which ultimately becomes part of your character.

Flexibility is a must for floaters, helping you roll with the punches of new coworkers and new work settings. Coworkers are more likely to have a positive attitude toward a floater when they know that person is willing to be flexible. Expect some colleagues to see you primarily as a helper, calling on you to assist them and to provide coverage on their breaks. Being flexible nurtures camaraderie, which can reduce tension and improve patient outcomes.

Being knowledgeable in a wide range of practice settings increases your proficiency--and your value. It could even advance you toward a management position, if desired. Knowledge and proficiency promote excellence in quality patient care and a safer environment, which in turn provide a calmer workplace.

Continuing your education not only is important to retaining your nursing license, but it also keeps you abreast of the latest research, techniques, equipment, procedures, and guidelines; helps you maintain your nursing skills; and deepens your knowledge base. To continue your education, you can complete continuing nursing education (CNE) modules, seminars, and hospital-mandated classes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

How to Succeed at Floating: Learn How to Decrease Your Stress and Increase Your Job Satisfaction as a Floater
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.