GAME,SEX ANDMATCH; LOVE MATCH DEVIL WEARS PRADA AUTHOR COURTS CONTROVERSY Lauren Weisberger Tells How She Hung out with Leading Women Tennis Players to Get Ideas for Her Scandalous New Novel

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), July 4, 2016 | Go to article overview

GAME,SEX ANDMATCH; LOVE MATCH DEVIL WEARS PRADA AUTHOR COURTS CONTROVERSY Lauren Weisberger Tells How She Hung out with Leading Women Tennis Players to Get Ideas for Her Scandalous New Novel


Byline: a.brown@dailyrecord.co.uk ANNIE BROWN

WOMEN'S tennis has been criticised for being boring but in the pages of new book The Singles Game, it is anything but.

If there was this much glamour, sex, scandal and partying in the game, everyone would pick up a racket.

We expect nothing less of the Devil Wears Prada author, that unforgettable foray into the bitch-fest of fashion that turned Lauren Weisberger in to a top player in the best seller list.

A decade after the film hit our screens grossing PS250million worldwide, Lauren has turned her attentions to the world of tennis, with the book's release timed as Wimbledon nears championship point.

The Devil Wears Prada was written in 2003, and was based on Lauren's experience working as an assistant to American Vogue editor Anna Wintour, who inspired Miranda Priestly, she of the acerbic put downs as deadly as a stiletto to the head.

Although Lauren picked up a racket at the age of four, she had no experience of professional tennis when she started the book, which centres on the meteoric rise of fictional player Charlotte Silver.

Lauren said "I played casually.

Nothing like my protaganist but I have played since I was a little girl and been a huge fan. A career in the sport was never on the cards for me. I didn't have what it takes from a talent or commitment standpoint."

She was certainly committed to the research, going behind the scenes at tournaments in Charleston, Miami, Wimbledon and the US Open.

She had access to players' lounges, the dining area and spoke to agents, managers, nutritionists and physios.

Lauren said:"There is a lot of waiting. They don't often know when they are going to go on and it depends on when the match ahead finishes.

"They have to find a good balance between being ready to go on and not being sure when it is going to happen."

"The tours last more than 10 months a year and the schedule for a top player is gruelling. I can't think of another sport like it. These women are on the road for incredibly long stretches at a time."

Women's tennis has been criticised for being not being aggressive enough and Charlotte's brutal coach, Todd Feltner tells her: "Wusses don't win slams".

It is overflowing with bitching, booze, sex and a failed drugs test.

On the latter, Lauren is keen to point out the book was at the printers when Maria Sharapova failed her drug test, so there is no connection.

Although the real world of tennis is more sweat and toil than racy, Lauren is adamant it isn't as boring as some critics suggest.

She said:"I couldn't disagree more. All you have to do is turn on the television and watch Serena Williams play.

"I don't know how anyone could call that boring.

"These women are incredible athletes and incredible competitors and I love watching them."

While she praises Andy Murray, The Singles Game focuses on women and there are elements, right down to what the players eat, that are on point.

Lauren said: "At heart, it is fiction but it was informed a lot by what I saw. The scenes about parties and drinking, I saw none of that but that makes for a good story. …

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