Farewell Dear Friend, We'll Miss You Terribly

The Mirror (London, England), July 11, 2016 | Go to article overview

Farewell Dear Friend, We'll Miss You Terribly


Byline: JOE LINDSAY The broadcaster worth tuning in to

I wasn't able to write this column last week. A friend of mine for over 20 years died and, to be honest, I couldn't think of anything to say about anything.

I first met Mark when we were working in the same company and we bonded over music, film, art and talked a lot about where we wanted to go and be in this life.

Mark recalls almost verbatim some advice I gave him back then; I don't really recall because so much advice came back at me over the past two decades that what I said was nowhere near as useful or eloquent as his undoubtedly was.

The gist of mine was, "Don't let the bastards grind you down".

Mark had the most incredible accent I have ever heard, he sounded like royalty in exile, with a laugh like no one else. It turned heads, it was loud and hearty and I can only describe it as the sound of a goose making sexy with a sealion.

Wonderful. And he laughed all the way from his boots. Correction, all the way from his flip-flops.

Mark wore flip-flops pretty much 10 months of the year.

I have no idea how he did it but when you radiate such warmth and light, you maybe don't feel the cold as much as most people.

The flip-flops weren't even his most unusual sartorial choice. He had the maddest, most flamboyant dress sense I've ever marvelled at.

No matter how wide the flares, most polyester of shirts, he carried it off because he was just so damned handsome. Movie star handsome. Picture a grunge Clark Gable.

I used to call him the Budget Tony Stark or Norn Iron Man, due to his resemblance to Robert Downey Jnr and the fact his favourite drink was pink Cava - fizzy pop for grown-ups.

He was far from a grown-up though. As professional and successful as he was, he had the heart and faith and mischief of a child.

The wide grin and glint in his eye was no lie. He was a wee rogue and no mistake. Everyone he encountered fell in love with him.

We couldn't help it.

Eccentric as hell, full of hugs and huge beaming smiles and maddeningly generous to pretty much everyone he encountered, whether he knew them well or just met. A huge heart.

A Harvard graduate, he had a fierce intellect he wore lightly and modestly. You were as likely to have a conversation about Foghorn Leghorn as you were Rainer Werner Fassbinder, but it was always fascinating and entertaining and hilarious.

Although he was younger than me, which he often pointed out, I always admired him.

He started Streetmonkey, an advertising/production company and Mark's motto for it, and indeed everything he did in life, was, "Work hard, make money, do good with it".

And he did a lot of good.

All week I've been talking to others who knew and loved him and everyone has a wealth of ta kn ev stories, a lot of them about his good deeds.

Spending 100s of pounds on dog food to donate to an animal sanctuary, helping those less fortunate and giving time and encouragement to those who needed it. Because, as many will testify, you didn't work for/with Mark, it was a family affair and he chose well. Frankly, I don't know how he did it all. Some man for one man. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Farewell Dear Friend, We'll Miss You Terribly
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.