Introduction to the Special Issue: The Intersectionality of Border Pedagogy and Secondary Education: Understanding and Learning from the Powerful Worlds and Lives of Latino/a Youth

By Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita | High School Journal, Summer 2016 | Go to article overview

Introduction to the Special Issue: The Intersectionality of Border Pedagogy and Secondary Education: Understanding and Learning from the Powerful Worlds and Lives of Latino/a Youth


Ramirez, Pablo C., Jimenez-Silva, Margarita, High School Journal


Like all people, we perceive the version of reality that our culture communicates. Like others having or living in more than one culture, we get multiple, often opposing messages. The coming together of two self-consistent but habitually incomparable frames of reference causes un choque, a cultural collision. --(Anzaldua, 1987, p.51)

For the past two decades, historically marginalized youth have been underachieving in educational settings. More specifically, Latino/a (1) secondary youth have not attained academic success in comparison to other youth (Ek, 2009; Gandara & Contreras, 2009; Contreras, 2011). Much of the blame from schools and other institutions is placed on students, families, and historically marginalized communities of color (Irizarry & Raible, 2011). According to the Pew Hispanic Center (Fry, 2014), Latino/a youth have one of the highest high school dropout rates in the educational system. Numerous research studies on secondary Latino/a youth have demonstrated that culturally irrelevant curricula, pedagogy, unqualified teachers, and other educational factors have influenced the academic path of secondary youth (see Madrid, 2011). Irizarry and Raible (2011) argued that the lives of Latino/a youth continue to be excluded from secondary schools. Further, this causes student disengagement in high schools.

Over the past ten years, the student population in the educational system has seen an increase in cultural, linguistic, and ethnic diversity. Further, with the rise and influx of immigrant populations in the United States, communities are becoming highly diverse and consequently, interaction between immigrant populations and mainstream institutions is increasing (Rios, 2013). The U.S Census projects that 50% of the population will consist of culturally, linguistically, racially, ethnic, and religiously diverse groups by 2050 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012). Despite the increasing growth of diversity within our national borders, issues concerning educational equity and equality have not always been well attended to in educational contexts. Schools and other institutions impacting youth must begin to recognize the daily experiences of students who live in two separate and disconnected worlds, that of home and school. Often, these worlds are in conflict.

Although Latino/a youth come to high school with multiple identities, various languages, rich cultural experiences, and powerful lived experiences, they are often pushed into the shadows. High schools, especially urban high school, can be alienating, dehumanizing, and culturally denigrating spaces for youth who are pushed to the margins (Valenzuela, 1999). Border pedagogy (Giroux, 1992) has emerged as a way to disrupt the manner in which marginalized youth are educated in secondary school settings. This special theme issue examines how border pedagogy influences the lives of Latino/a youth in secondary schools.

Major Concepts, Research Issues, and Ideas Examined

Border pedagogy (Garza, 2007) has been enacted to interrupt the way in which marginalized youth learn within the educational system. Border pedagogy draws from the guiding principles of critical theory (Giroux, 1992) and critical pedagogy (Freire, 1974). Furthermore, border pedagogy is an understanding that there are ideological, epistemological, social and cultural margins that make up the language of power, history and difference (Giroux, 1992). Moreover, conceptual boundaries limit the potential of individuals who are different from those in power. Latino youth and other students of color are disengaged because they don't see themselves reflected in books, schools, and school curriculum (Bartolome, 2008; hooks; 2003; Prieto & Villenas, 2012). Border pedagogy engages learners in multiple references that constitute different cultural codes, experiences and languages to help them construct their own narratives and histories and revise democracy through sociocultural negotiation (Wilson, Ek, Ty, & Douglas, 2014). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Introduction to the Special Issue: The Intersectionality of Border Pedagogy and Secondary Education: Understanding and Learning from the Powerful Worlds and Lives of Latino/a Youth
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.