Stars with a Lincoln Link; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS

Daily Mail (London), July 20, 2016 | Go to article overview

Stars with a Lincoln Link; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS


Byline: Compiled by Charles Legge

QUESTION

Are there any relatives of Abraham Lincoln still about?

ABRAHAM LINCOLN (1809-1865) was married to Mary Todd (1818-1882). The couple had four sons, but only the eldest, Robert Todd Lincoln (1842-1926), survived into adulthood.

Robert married Mary Harlan in 1868 and they had three children: Mary (1869-1938), Abraham 'Jack' (1873-1890) and Jessie Harlan (1875-1948).

Abraham died aged 17, before marrying. Mary married Charles B. Isham and bore him one son, Lincoln Isham (1892-1971), who married Leahalma Correa (who died in 1960). That marriage was childless.

Jessie eloped to marry Warren W. Beckwith, a minor league baseball player, in 1897, with whom she had two children -- Mary Lincoln Beckwith (1898-1975) and Robert Todd Lincoln Beckwith (1904-1985) -- before divorcing in 1907.

In 1915, Jessie got married again -- to explorer Frank E. Johnson. That marriage was childless, as was her third marriage to Robert J. Randolph, in 1926.

Mary Lincoln Beckwith, President Lincoln's great-granddaughter, never married. Her brother, Robert Lincoln Beckwith, married twice, to Hazel Holland Wilson and Annemarie Hoffman.

He never had any children and, when he died in 1985, the direct Lincoln line ended.

There are, of course, many people with indirect links to the president -- for instance, Hollywood actor George Clooney is related to him through Lincoln's maternal grandmother Lucy Hanks (1767-1833).

Adrian Lewis, Tenby, Pembrokeshire.

AN EPISODE of the BBC genealogical show Coming Home featured comedian and actor Ben Miller, star of The Armstrong And Miller Show and Death In Paradise.

Genealogist Mike Churchill-Jones noted that Miller's paternal great-grandmother was Rose Elizabeth Lincoln (1892-1957).

Through this line, he was able to connect Miller to the U.S. president -- albeit through a very distant ancestor, one Robert Lincoln who lived between 1506 and 1599 in Norfolk. Miller was delighted.

Eleanor Gatton, Preston, Lancs.

QUESTION

How many golf courses does Donald Trump own?

THE U.S presidential nominee Donald Trump claims to have 'the greatest golf portfolio ever assembled by one man' (he also claims to have a golf handicap of four). His claim is not far-fetched: he owns 16 golf resorts, home to 23 courses with two more in the pipeline.

His first acquisition, in 1999, was the 7,326-yard Jim Fazio-designed course at West Palm Beach in Florida.

Most courses are in and around New York, but there are others in Philadelphia, North Carolina and Los Angeles.

Trump made a controversial entrance into the British market in 2011 when he built Trump International, Aberdeen, and the five-star Trump International hotel, upsetting many environmentalists.

The links at Doonbeg, Ireland, opened in 2002, were bought in 2014 by Trump and re-named Trump International Golf Links, Ireland. In 2014, he caused consternation in the golf world when he purchased the Turnberry resort in Scotland.

The 7,211-yard Ailsa course has played home to several major tournaments, including The Open.

Trump International Golf Club, Dubai, opened earlier this year. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Stars with a Lincoln Link; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.