Executive Coaching Fills Leadership Gaps

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 25, 2016 | Go to article overview

Executive Coaching Fills Leadership Gaps


From the mid-2000s and continuing today, executive coaching has evolved into a $1.5 billion industry and a needed resource for C-suite executives and senior leaders. Because these leaders are key contributors in executing strategic goals and delivering impactful business results, they are more willing than ever to do what it takes to be successful.

There are many reasons executives seek out coaches, but most of the reasons focus on implementing change in their organization. According to Ed Bohlke, founder of Deserve Level Coaching, the top reasons he has seen executives seek out coaches are to deal with a crisis, seek a different viewpoint, or grow leadership, decision-making, and communication skills. "If by working with a coach, senior leaders can find any blind spots (in their leadership) they didn't know existed and develop a new level of leadership, it can alter the trajectory of the company."

Commitments for executive coaching sessions require both time and money. With the median coaching session costing $500/hour and most programs lasting at minimum three months, serious consideration is needed by both the executive and the organization. The coaching should be viewed as not only an investment in the leader, but in the organization as a whole. Michaelene George, an executive coach with 25 years coaching experience asks two questions when senior leaders and organizations are determining the potential return on investment (ROI) for the cost of the coaching. She asks "What will happen if you don't do anything?" and "What is the cost if change does not occur?" She further asks leaders to consider what adding new behaviors could mean to their leadership ability.

Because of the variety of approaches offered by executive coaches, it is imperative senior leaders are committed and willing to actively participate in finding a coach that will meet their needs. Finding the right executive coach is key to getting the biggest ROI. The leader will often go through an initial assessment to determine if there is a chemistry between coach and coachee. "I offer an exploratory session at no fee where the leader and I interview each other," Grace Lichtenstein, executive coach and psychotherapist explains. …

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