WHAT UTTER BLINDNESS! Mail Probe Reveals How Three in Four NHS Trusts Deny Life-Changing Cataract Surgery to Thousands

Daily Mail (London), July 29, 2016 | Go to article overview

WHAT UTTER BLINDNESS! Mail Probe Reveals How Three in Four NHS Trusts Deny Life-Changing Cataract Surgery to Thousands


Byline: Sophie Borland and Josh White

THREE quarters of hospitals are denying the elderly life-changing cataract operations until they have all but lost their sight, a Mail investigation reveals today.

Health trusts are refusing to offer the surgery unless a patient's vision is so poor they cannot read large letters displayed on a wall - with glasses.

Even then, some trusts only refer patients for surgery if they have fallen twice in the last year, also have hearing problems, care for a loved one, or live alone.

The life-transforming procedure costs less than PS1,000 per eye - yet it is being rationed by NHS managers so that even those in direst need are being subjected to humiliating tests and form-filling exercises.

More than half of over-65s, some 4.5million individuals, suffer from cataracts to some degree. They occur when the lens in the eye becomes cloudy with age.

But campaigners say thousands of patients are now losing their sight and being condemned to misery because the NHS won't treat them until they are nearly blind.

To make matters worse, it has emerged that some foreign health tourists have been able to jump the queue for the surgery. An investigation using Freedom of Information requests today reveals:

Seventy-three per cent of hospitals have imposed strict guidelines which determine only those worst-affected by the condition are treated,

Seventy-three per cent of hospitals have imposed strict guidelines which determine only those worst-affected are treated,

Patients must fail a sight test when wearing glasses and sometimes also prove they cannot work, read or recognise loved ones,

In some instances, they have to fill out a form, ticking whether they have fallen over, live alone or care for a loved one,

Half of hospitals will only do the worstaffected eye. Patients are told they only need to see out of one,

Waiting times for those who are allowed the operation are up to a year and a half.

Cataracts get worse with time and some victims are so severely affected they cannot read, watch TV, recognise faces or drive.

But the condition is easily treatable with a 30-minute operation to remove the cloudy lens and replace it with a plastic implant.

The Mail used Freedom of Information requests to ask all 150 hospital trusts whether they imposed 'eligibility criteria' to determine who was allowed cataract surgery. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

WHAT UTTER BLINDNESS! Mail Probe Reveals How Three in Four NHS Trusts Deny Life-Changing Cataract Surgery to Thousands
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.