The Power of Art Therapy

By Lowe, Bill | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 1, 2016 | Go to article overview

The Power of Art Therapy


Lowe, Bill, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Bill Lowe, Chicagoland Methodist Senior Services

Memory loss can fundamentally alter how a person connects to the world around them. However, the arts have shown time after time to have a profound impact on memory, allowing many to engage with loved ones and express themselves in new and powerful ways.

This fall, Bringing Art to Life, a project led by Dr. Daniel C. Potts and Ellen Potts, is expanding to Chicago with the support of High Socks for Hope, the foundation started by White Sox pitcher David Robertson and his wife Erin Robertson. In Chicago, the project will have a special focus on veterans with memory loss, in keeping with a key mission of High Socks for Hope: veterans' relief.

Bringing Art to Life - Chicago will roll out at Chicagoland Methodist Senior Services (CMSS), where we're proud to add this to our Engagement Through the Arts initiative alongside Music & MemorySM, a renowned music therapy program that launched at CMSS earlier this year. In July, we held a kickoff event at CMSS' Wesley Place, led by licensed art therapist Jenn Ross, along with Angela Ray and Cyrus Alavi, project directors from Bringing Art to Life u Chicago. David, Erin and their young son came by to help launch the program and talk to the group about their art.

Here's what we saw at that event -- and how you can bring the benefits of art therapy to others with memory loss.

Making connections, sharing stories

Part of the power of art therapy is its ability to help people open up and forge connections. Married couple Richard and Jean Anderson participated in this kickoff together. Richard, who served in the Naval Air Force Reserve and was active during the Cuban missile crisis, lives with Parkinson's disease, as well as memory loss. Together, the couple created a magnificent piece based on the quote, "Without change, there could be no butterflies."

Jean says she's experienced firsthand that art therapy can restore some of one's ability to connect with the world around them that memory loss limits. She credits the program with giving people the opportunity to reach outside of themselves.

"That's the gift of being alive u it's being connected," said Jean. "This art program gives people the means by which they can re-establish and maintain that connectedness. Maybe they'll paint something from a memory or someone loved."

During the program, Teresa Reilly, who served as an Army nurse in World War II, shared stories of her childhood on a farm, her time in the Army and her career after the war ended, teaching other nurses. Teresa seemed to thoroughly enjoy telling these stories and was engaged in the process. She even told David Robertson about the time she went to a White Sox game with a school group, decades before he joined the team. Her memory didn't waver, even when it came to the finer details about the game she attended. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Power of Art Therapy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.