We've Always Been Great Believers in Telling It like It Is; FUELLED BY CRISIS SINGERS ON MIXING MUSIC AND POLITICS Deacon Blue's Ricky and Lorraine Reveal How Plight of Refugees Formed Backdrop to Writing New Album

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), September 17, 2016 | Go to article overview

We've Always Been Great Believers in Telling It like It Is; FUELLED BY CRISIS SINGERS ON MIXING MUSIC AND POLITICS Deacon Blue's Ricky and Lorraine Reveal How Plight of Refugees Formed Backdrop to Writing New Album


Byline: PAUL ENGLISH p.english@dailyrecord.co.uk

THE song speaks of children on a journey, of belief in better times and of hope in the face of ignorance.

Deacon Blue's recent single The Believers put them back on radio playlists with an upbeat and optimistic pop song as timely as it was tuneful. But it also split the audience.

No surprise, some might say, in these days of Brexit and the divisive debate around the ongoing refugee crisis.

For husband and wife singers Ricky Ross and Lorraine McIntosh, whose songs have reflected politics and society for 30 years, there was never any doubt images in the news would colour their songs.

Lead singer and songwriter Ricky said: "The refugee story is the backdrop to the whole album. It was happening all the time that we were writing it, so it was very definitely there in the background.

"It is for many people, because I think we just don't know how to deal with it."

The Believers, though, isn't a straightforward reflection on international migration or religion. Instead, the band say the song, and the tone of their new album Believers, was formed from the notion of trust.

Ricky, 58, said: "You contemplate the pros and cons of any argument, relationships, buying a house, getting a job, voting in a referendum.

"You weigh it all up and you make your decision based on your gut instinct. That got me thinking about how in so many situations we give ourselves over to trust and belief, and that's how humanity works in its best possible way.

"It's that Malcolm Gladwell thing," he added, referencing the bestselling author of Blink, a book which looks at how we make split-second decisions.

"There was another story behind the song, about an Indonesian priest speaking to people on death row.

"He had to go round them all and said to them, 'Don't worry, I'm not going to be far behind you.' I thought that was beautiful, that idea of coming along behind you."

The song's video invited a more straightforward interpretation but attracted criticism, with some taking to the band's social media channels to complain about a perceived political overtone.

For Lorraine, 52, the response was equally straightforward.

She said: "People say things like, 'They should leave politics out of their songs - I'm done with them.' But if you think we've never been political before then you don't know much about the band.

"Anyway, it's not politics, really. It's about people and their lives. We are part of a continent where people are washing up on the shores.

"What are we meant to do? Just pretend it's not happening? Not let it affect us? It should affect everyone with a conscience."

Ricky added: "That song isn't about religious belief or political belief. It's about belief in human beings. That's the stuff we have to work on, the stuff that gets us through."

The new album is the revitalised band's eighth, and their third since 2012, working with producer Paul Savage at Chem19 studios in Lanarkshire.

Ricky said: "It's not necessarily a trilogy.

But they've come so close together and have been with the same producer.

"The Hipsters was about the band, A New House was about Scotland and the land and this one is about belief and trust. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

We've Always Been Great Believers in Telling It like It Is; FUELLED BY CRISIS SINGERS ON MIXING MUSIC AND POLITICS Deacon Blue's Ricky and Lorraine Reveal How Plight of Refugees Formed Backdrop to Writing New Album
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.