September 17, 2016 ON THIS DAY

Daily Mail (London), September 17, 2016 | Go to article overview

September 17, 2016 ON THIS DAY


Byline: COMPILED BY ETAN SMALLMAN

IT'S DAY 261...

SAMUEL JOHNSON'S A Dictionary Of The English Language, was published 261 years ago, after taking nine years to complete. He was paid PS1,575 -- equivalent to PS220,000 today. He offended Scots by defining oats as: 'A Grain, which in England is given to horses but in Scotland supports the people.'

MARTINA NAVRATILOVA is Wimbledon's oldest champion. She was 46 years and 261 days when she won the mixed doubles with Leander Paes in 2003 -- three years before she retired with 59 Grand Slam titles (18 singles, 31 doubles and ten mixed doubles).

THE longest distance danced by a Morris dancing team is 26.1 miles. The six-strong Shakespeare's Revenge team skipped and jumped from Madder Market in Norwich to South Walsham, Norfolk, in eight hours.

THERE ARE 105 DAYS LEFT

IN THE census taken 105 years ago, suffragette Emily Wilding Davison hid in a cupboard in Westminster so she could be recorded as a House of Commons resident. The 1911 census form records her address as: 'Found hiding in crypt of Westminster Hall.' There is a commemorative plaque in the cupboard, put there by Labour MP Tony Benn.

AL CAPONE (right) was estimated by the U.S. attorney's office in Chicago to have made $105million in 1927 alone -- the highest income of anyone in the U.S. -- from bootlegging, vice and gambling. Capone, who never filed a tax return, was jailed for 11 years in 1931 for income tax evasion, but released in 1939 suffering from syphilis.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

DAMON HILL, 56. The former racing driver is the only son of a Formula One world champion to win the title himself -- in 1996.

His father Graham won the title twice, in 1962 and 1968, and died in a plane crash when Damon was 15. Damon's first car was a PS200 1964 Volkswagen Beetle. …

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September 17, 2016 ON THIS DAY
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