Updated Drinking Water Advisory Communication Toolkit

By Blake, Robert G.; Yoder, Jonathan et al. | Journal of Environmental Health, October 2016 | Go to article overview

Updated Drinking Water Advisory Communication Toolkit


Blake, Robert G., Yoder, Jonathan, Kou, John, Journal of Environmental Health


There have been several high profile contamination events of various municipal water systems, which serve as a reminder of the need for continual preparedness for emergencies and outbreaks related to water. In recent years, numerous emergencies associated with drinking water were caused by multiple factors including

* pipeline infrastructure failures;

* natural disasters damaging water distribution systems;

* contamination of drinking water by chemicals, toxins, and microbes; and

* construction operations severing water mains.

The Drinking Water Advisory Communication Toolkit (DWACT) is designed to help local water utilities, health departments, and community emergency managers create accurate and timely public messaging about these drinking water emergencies.

The DWACT was originally published in 2011 (http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/ emergency/dwa-comm-toolbox/index.html?s_ cid=cs_001). It was the product of collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), and the American Water Works Association (AWWA), along with many external contributors and reviewers including the National Environmental Health Association. It was originally published to help prevent biological outbreaks following a water emergency. It is now being released in an updated edition.

The DWACT addresses four basic types of drinking water advisories.

1. Boil water advisory (most common): This advisory is typically issued because of concern about microbial contamination. The advisory may be either precautionary or mandatory.

2. Informational advisories: These announce planned or anticipated changes in water quality and provide advice on appropriate actions.

3. Do not drink advisories: These direct customers to use an alternative source of water and are typically issued because of concern about chemical or toxin contamination that cannot be addressed by boiling the water.

4. Do not use advisories: These instruct customers not to use tap water for any purpose, including flushing toilets or bathing. These types of advisories are issued only if microbial, chemical, or radiological contamination undoubtedly has occurred where any water contact can be dangerous.

The DWACT has been updated to reflect lessons learned in real-life emergencies since its original publication. Updated guidance addresses needs identified as a result of the following responses.

* Chemical spills such as those affecting the Elk River in West Virginia (January 2014).

* Harmful algal blooms affecting the Toledo, Ohio, water supply (August 2014).

* A Cryptosporidium outbreak in Baker City, Oregon, that resulted in an extended boil water advisory (July 2013).

* The Super Storm Sandy response and resulting water sanitation concerns in high-rise buildings in New York City (October 2012).

The DWACT also had importance in a water outage that affected all CDC campuses in Atlanta. The afteraction meetings with officials from DeKalb County, Georgia, allowed us to gain new insight into the needs of local communities in these kinds of events. The new edition contains a number of updates within the text, as well as new pages to address gaps and enhance its usefulness. Below is a list of the new content in this edition.

* Just-in-Time Planning and Response for Water Advisories: A quick guide to help water utilities that haven't had a chance to preplan and address their most pressing communication priorities in the event of an unexpected water advisory. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Updated Drinking Water Advisory Communication Toolkit
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.