The Culture Warrior

By Lind, Michael | The National Interest, July-August 2016 | Go to article overview

The Culture Warrior


Lind, Michael, The National Interest


Michael Mandelbaum, Mission Failure: America and the World in the Post--Cold War Era (New York: Oxford University Press, 2016), 504 pp., $29.95.

In 1996, Michael Mandelbaum, who teaches international relations at Johns Hopkins University, published an essay entitled "Foreign Policy As Social Work" in Foreign Affairs. In it, he decried the Clinton administration's interventions in Bosnia, Somalia and Haiti. "These failed interventions," he wrote, "expressed the view of the worldwide role of the United States that the members of the Clinton foreign policy team brought to office." A decade later, he published The Case for Goliath: How America Acts as the World's Government in the Twenty-First Century. It formed an eloquent statement of "liberal hegemony theory," the contention that the role of the post-Cold War United States as the sole hegemon has enabled both great-power peace and the benefits of economic globalization.

In Mission Failure: America and the World in the Post--Cold War Era, Mandelbaum blends these themes in a sweeping narrative history from the end of the Cold War until the present that seeks to diagnose where America has gone astray. Mandelbaum advances four major arguments. The first one essentially restates the thesis of The Case for Goliath that America's overwhelming military superiority following the Cold War suppressed traditional great-power rivalries. The second is that the absence of great-power conflict made possible an era of economic globalization from which all sides benefited. The third argument holds that the relaxation of traditional great-power rivalries enabled the Clinton, Bush and Obama administrations to seek to effect the liberalization and democratization of foreign societies out of idealism, rather than on the basis of traditional strategic calculations--in other words, as "social work." And the fourth thesis maintains that most of these projects of democratic transformation abroad were doomed from the outset because of the inherent difficulties in implanting Western values in backward, authoritarian societies.

Mandelbaum is an accomplished scholar and a skillful writer, two qualities that don't always go hand in hand. But just how persuasive are his principal contentions? In examining the past few decades of U.S. foreign policy, Mandelbaum seeks to upend conventional wisdom about America's role abroad. Ultimately, however, he affirms it.

The problems begin with Mandelbaum's contention that post--Cold War U.S. military supremacy so effectively suppressed great-power rivalries that the very nature of world politics changed for several decades, with every other great power, including China and Russia for a time, embracing or at least acquiescing in a benign Pax Americana. "American power defined what President George H. W. Bush called 'the new world order,' along with three other features of international relations after the Cold War"--economic globalization, the limitation of nuclear weapons to "countries that could be relied upon not to use them" and

   the lack of interest on the part
   of China and Russia, each with the capacity
   to act as a traditional great power, in pursuing
   the assertive policies that in the past had put
   rivalry, security, and military competition at the
   center of international relations.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

According to Mandelbaum, the post-Cold War order's defining trait was "the absence of the military and political competition between and among the strongest states around which international politics had traditionally revolved."

For reasons rooted in the cultures and domestic politics of China and Russia, security competition among the great powers has returned:

   By 2014 both [China and Russia] had abandoned
   their reticence and restraint in favor of
   the classic great-power quest to control more
   territory.... Chinese and Russian foreign policies
   reversed the revolution in international
   politics that had taken place at the end of the
   Cold War. … 

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