Meet Me in St. Louis

By Jacoby-Garrett, Paula M. | Parks & Recreation, October 2016 | Go to article overview

Meet Me in St. Louis


Jacoby-Garrett, Paula M., Parks & Recreation


St. Louis has a rich history of originality, ingenuity and cultural diversity. Founded in 1764 by French fur trader Pierre Laclede Liguest, the city's earliest immigrants were primarily from France, Germany, Italy, Ireland and Poland. Today, St. Louis is a melting pot of people from all over the world, including Latin America, Africa and Asia.

Home to close to three million residents, St. Louis continues to maintain distinct cultural districts with authentic food, shops and seasonal events. From the grounds of the Gateway Arch to the Italian Food on the Hill, St. Louis has something for everyone in its unique sites, attractions, activities and restaurants, so take the time to enjoy what this grand city has to offer.

Places to See

St. Louis Arch--Jefferson National

Expansion Memorial

Nothing says St. Louis more than the iconic St. Louis Arch. The nation's tallest monument, it's also the largest arch in the world. You can take a tram to the top of the arch, which is managed by the National Park Service, and visit the museum located beneath it. The St. Louis Riverfront area, along the Mississippi River near the arch, is full of activities for every type of visitor, from paddleboat cruises and helicopter tours to seasonal events and local attractions.

Address: 11. North 4th St.

St. Louis, MO 63102

Hours: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily Website: www.nps.gov/jeff/ planyourvisit/gateway-arch.htm Admission: Adults $3, children under 16 are free

Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis

Containing one of the largest collections of mosaics in the Western Hemisphere, the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis is a true masterpiece. More than 83,000 square feet of mosaics coupled with the 7,621 pipes of the Great Cathedral Organ make this 100-year-old structure a sensory marvel unlike any other. The cathedral is not only a tourist destination--it is also a special place of worship with masses held daily.

Address: 4431 Lindell Blvd.

St. Louis, MO 63108

Hours: 7 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays; both self and guided tours are available. Call 314-373-8241 for more information.

Website: www.cathedralstl.org

Admission: $2 suggested admission

St. Louis Zoo

Formed in 1910, the St. Louis Zoo is one of the top zoos in the nation, housing more than 14,000 species across a sprawling 90 acres. Highlights include the newly opened Tasmanian Devil Den and McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibit.

Address: One Government Dr.

St. Louis, MO 63110

Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily Website: www.stlzoo.org Admission: Admission is free, but there are fees for the parking and for some of the special attractions

Missouri Botanical Gardens

Almost 80 acres, the Missouri Botanical Gardens was founded in 1859 and is one of the top botanical gardens in the nation. Designated as both a National

Historic Landmark and on the National Register of Historic Places, the facility hosts a Japanese garden and three conservatories, among other attractions.

Address: 4344 Shaw Blvd.

St. Louis, MO 63110

Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Website: www.missouribotanicalgarden.org

Admission: Adults $15; children 3-12 $5

Saint Louis Art Museum

Established in 1879, the Saint Louis Art Museum is located in historic Forest Park. Touted as one of the principal art museums in the United States, the museum has featured exhibitions as well as rotating installations. The building was designed by Cass Gilbert for the 1904 World's Fair and is the last remaining building from the fair.

Address: One Fine Arts Dr., Forest Park

St. Louis, MO 83110

Hours: Tuesday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

Website: www.slam.org

Admission: Free

Anheuser-Busch Brewery

One of the largest and oldest in the nation, the Anheuser-Busch Brewery includes three National Historic Landmarks and provides visitors with the opportunity to witness the beer making process. …

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