Facsimile Edition of the First Czech Theoretical Treatise on Music

By Panek, Jaroslav | Czech Music, July 2016 | Go to article overview

Facsimile Edition of the First Czech Theoretical Treatise on Music


Panek, Jaroslav, Czech Music


Jan Blahoslav: Musica. A Facsimile of the 1569 Edition (Ivancice: Jednota bratrska / Unity of the Brethren), according to a copy maintained at the library of the National Museum in Prague (mark 27 F 23). Prepared for publishing by Petr Danek and Jiri K. Kroupa, KLP--Koniasch Latin Press, 2016, 99 folios + 56 pp, ISBN 978-80-87773-37-6

The 70th anniversary of the Prague Spring international music festival was commemorated by its organisers in the best possible way in collaboration with the Association for Central European Cultural Studies and the National Museum in Prague, they embraced the initiative suggested by the distinguished Czech musicologist Petr Danek and supported the facsimile edition of the first Czech compendium on the theory of music. The Prague Spring thus endorsed the deep roots of musical culture and made accessible a work that is yet to be afforded the position in musicology and general history of culture it so richly deserves.

Jan Blahoslav (1523-1571) was one of the major figures of 16th-century Czech culture. His life was connected with the Unity of the Brethren, a Bohemian religious denomination who linked up to the teachings of the Christian reformist Jan Hus. After completing his studies at the brotherhood's schools in Moravia, Jan Blahoslav went abroad so as further his education in Goldberg, Wittenberg and Basel, where he became acquainted with the ideas of humanism and the Reformation movement. A man of letters and a scholar, throughout his life he wrote texts in Czech with the aim to extend the knowledge of the Unity of the Brethren members. His legacy ranges from brief essays, discourses, religiously educational and moralising articles and commentaries, to several significant works, and was rounded off with a translation of the New Testament into Czech (1564). Blahoslav also had a keen interest in music. Moreover, he edited two Czech hymn-books: the Samotuly (1561) and the Ivancice (1564), in connection with the preparation of which he penned the very first theoretical treatise on music in Czech, titled Musica. The first edition, published in Olomouc in 1558, has not been preserved in its entirety. The second, completed and extended, edition dates from 1569 and was issued by the Unity of Brethren's printing office in Ivancice, and has been preserved in two copies (Prague, Wroclaw). This year, the Prague copy was published as a facsimile, supplemented by a study in Czech and English.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

When, half a century ago, in 1966, Josef Janacek issued his biography of Jan Blahoslav (1523-1574), he included among the extracts from his works the conclusion, in which the Czech humanist emphasises the necessity of rudimentary theoretical knowledge for spontaneous composition of songs and music in general. The short, yet characteristic, text revealed that Blahoslav did not only stress the importance of being musically proficient, he also bore in mind that music and its availability were of significance for a broad humanist education, a principle peculiar to the mature Unity of Brethren, which would be given an ingenious programme form by Blahoslav's successor Jan Amos Komensky. In addition to the religious and ethical aspects, in his text Blahoslav accentuated the communicative function and psychological role of music and, in the wider sense, language itself. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Facsimile Edition of the First Czech Theoretical Treatise on Music
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.