Client Safety: What Does "Line of Sight" Mean?

By Pollack, Daniel | Policy & Practice, October 2016 | Go to article overview

Client Safety: What Does "Line of Sight" Mean?


Pollack, Daniel, Policy & Practice


When caring for vulnerable clients, adult supervision is a must. Indeed, some situations demand that clients be kept directly in a "line of sight," and regulations and training manuals frequently use this phrase. For instance, New Jersey's Department of Children and Families, Division of Children Protection and Permanency, describes a program called Intensive Residential Treatment Services as "a highly structured non-hospital based treatment setting that brings comprehensive and specialized diagnostic and treatment services to youth and their families. The youth approved for these programs require exceptional care on a 24/7 basis in a safe environment with continuous line of sight supervision, medication management, and a concentrated individualized treatment protocol." (1) In the criminal context, courts have found that a police officer's "use of deadly force to be reasonable when a suspect moves out of the officer's line of sight such that the officer could reasonably believe the suspect was reaching for a weapon." (2)

In the context of caring for vulnerable clients, what exactly does line of sight mean? Does line of sight mean a staff person must be looking at the client all the time, or does it mean a client is simply able to be seen by a staff person? The difference is not just semantic. The first requires that the client always be in the vision of a staff person. The second connotes that a staff person has an unobstructed view of the client, the client can be observed even in just the staff person's peripheral vision, but the staff person is not necessarily constantly looking directly at the client. Thus, activities may be conducted in rooms with unobstructed glass windows or with the door to the room remaining completely open. In an outdoor setting, activities are conducted within the general vision of a staff member.

Rather than pronouncing one definition correct and the other incorrect, it is more accurate to conclude that there is a range of definitions, including the idea that a staff person must always have a general--passive--line of sight, but must also have direct--active--visual contact with a client at designated frequencies.

When I was an attorney for the Ohio Department of Youth Services, the department that operates Ohio's juvenile prisons, we developed a clear policy for suicidal youth: When a child was a known, recently active, suicide risk, he was placed in a cell adjacent to a correction officer's post, and, for a specified period of time, a corrections officer always watched that child. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Client Safety: What Does "Line of Sight" Mean?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.