A Powerful Tool to Pinpoint and Prevent Prescription Drug Abuse

Policy & Practice, October 2016 | Go to article overview

A Powerful Tool to Pinpoint and Prevent Prescription Drug Abuse


Opioid Abuse: An Escalating Problem

In 2014, nearly 19,000 people died from prescription opioid-related causes--a 16 percent increase from 2013. (1) Killing more people than automobile accidents, approximately 78 Americans are fatally overdosing on opioids each and every day, according to the CDC.

One of the most devastating aspects of opioids is their ability to cut across all socioeconomic classes and demographics. "This is not a problem that is only impacting people who have gone astray and break the law," says Dr. Este Geraghty, chief medical officer and health solutions director at Esri. "This is a problem that affects a lot of people and it could be your neighbor, your mother--people you might not have initially expected."

Across the country, state and local government leaders are grappling with how to get ahead of the problem, Including limiting painkiller prescriptions and launching prescription drug monitoring programs. In July, President Obama signed the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (CARA), which increases the availability of naloxone, strengthens Monitoring and expands educational efforts.

But funding is an issue. While Obama had asked Congress for $1 billion for CARA, the Act included a fraction of that at $181 million. Advocates say funding to address prevention and early treatment of opioid abuse is critical.

"We know that public health is traditionally under-funded and resources are always limited," says Geraghty. …

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A Powerful Tool to Pinpoint and Prevent Prescription Drug Abuse
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