Hail TO THE CHIEFS; A Hangman, a Peanut Farmer and a Cowboy Have All Been President of the USA. MARION MCMULLEN Looks at Those Who Have Held Power before Donald Trump

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), November 22, 2016 | Go to article overview

Hail TO THE CHIEFS; A Hangman, a Peanut Farmer and a Cowboy Have All Been President of the USA. MARION MCMULLEN Looks at Those Who Have Held Power before Donald Trump


Byline: MARION MCMULLEN

ACTOR turned politician Ronald Reagan (1911-2004) could boast he was the holder of the title of Most Nearly Perfect Male Figure Award from the University of California, back in 1940.

The son of an Irish immigrant shoe salesman featured in more than 50 Hollywood movies, including Bonzo Goes To College - alongside a chimp co-star -before he became the 40th US President in 1981.

Satirical British TV puppet show Spitting Image famously ran a series of comedy sketches about the search for Reagan's brain.

Gerald Ford (1913-2006), the 38th President, worked as a model during college and had the job of feeding the bears when he was a forest ranger at Yellowstone National Park.

Peanut farmer James Earl "Jimmy" Carter (born 1924) had the distinction of being the first President to be born in a hospital and also went on record saying he had seen a UFO. He reported the sighting in 1969, saying the object was bright white at first and changed colour several times before disappearing.

The first US president, George Washington (1732-1799), never lived in the White House and had to borrow $600 to attend his own inauguration in 1789. He holds the record for the shortest inauguration speech, at just 133 words.

William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) was a little more loquacious, but it didn't do him any favours. His speech in 1841 ran for 8,578 words and lasted one hour and 40 minutes - the longest so far. He ended up contracting pneumonia because the weather was so bad during the ceremony ... he was dead a month later.

The daddy of all Presidents was John Tyler (1790-1862) in 1841. He had 15 children - eight by his first wife and seven by his second - and was 70 when his last child, Pearl, was born.

Grover Cleveland (1837-1908), who was inaugurated in 1885, was a hangman before he became President and was the sheriff of Erie County, New York.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), who gave his name to the teddy bear, is the youngest man to ever become President. He was just 42 when he took office in 1901 and was also the first president to win a Nobel Peace Prize.

He had his own ranch in the Badlands of Dakota and drove cattle. The archetypal cowboy, he even captured an outlaw before beginning his career in politics.

His favourite proverb was: "Speak softly and carry a big stick."

John F Kennedy (1917-1963) was the first Catholic to become President when he won the 1961 election. …

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