Causal Relationship between Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction of Library and Information Professionals: A Canonical Correlation Analysis

By Kunle, Ogunlana Emmanuel; Oshinaike A. B. et al. | Library Philosophy and Practice, August 2016 | Go to article overview

Causal Relationship between Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction of Library and Information Professionals: A Canonical Correlation Analysis


Kunle, Ogunlana Emmanuel, Oshinaike A. B., Ibrahim, Rasaq Oluwadare, Library Philosophy and Practice


Introduction

The relationship between organizational commitment and job satisfaction has received much attention from behavioural scientists and researchers overtime. Researchers examined the relationship between highly organizational commitment and job satisfaction; discussed relationship factors between organisational commitment and employee turnover and job satisfaction; investigated the relationship between organisational commitment and the overall effectiveness of an organisation. Organizational commitment and job satisfaction have been two of the recurring constructs in the scientific literature about work organization. Traditionally, they have been associated with the desired and undesired behavior of those who interact inside an organizational system. These concepts have always sought to accurately measure and improve both the organisation as a whole and the individual workers (Meyer, Stanley, Herscovitch and Topolnytsky, 2002 and Petzall, Clayton and Margret, 2006).

The impact of job satisfaction on organizational commitment has also been studied extensively, since the evolution of the concept of organizational commitment; researchers have been working in different organization on the antecedent and impacts of organizational commitment and job satisfaction.

The concept of organizational commitment in management and behavioral sciences literature is described as the most important element of the correlation between persons and organizations; it is the relative strength of an individual's identification with and involvement in a particular organization; it is an individual's psychological bond to the organization, including a sense of job involvement, loyalty, and a belief in the organization's values. It is a subject of much interest in academic research in terms of providing the continuity of the organizations, merging the objectives of the organization with the purposes of the employees, increasing employee satisfaction, reducing the rate of labor turnover, identifying employees themselves with the organization, and employees' using their knowledge and skills for the organization. Organizational commitment has been linked to important outcomes such as performance and turnover, actual performance, organizational citizenship behavior, turnover, work effort, intention to search or leave, job performance, self-reported citizenship, and absenteeism (Riketta, 2002; Meyer, Stanley, Herscovitch and Topolnytsky, 2002; Pfeffes and Salincik, 2003; Cohen, 2006; Sharma and Bajpai, 2010 and Tok, 2013).

Organizational commitment is matter of concern both for employee and employer for better work environment of the organization. It improves the attitude of the employee towards the job and organizational retention is developed gradually as the employee analyzes nature of the organization, culture, environment, standards and moral. Organizational commitment is an approach showing employee's devotion to the particular organization, and a continuing procedure during which employees convey their apprehension for the particular organization and its continuous achievement. It is a major element in employee bonding with organizational environment. Organizational commitment is simply a triangle which shows an employee's recognition with, participation in, and devotion to a particular organization.

The study of organizational commitment requires a multi-dimensional approach as multiple forms of commitment have been identified. Commitment has been conceptualized at the job, organizational, and occupational levels as individuals can be committed to different components of the work situation; distinctions also exist among the types of organizational commitment. Key dimensions of organizational commitment include calculative, attitudinal, affective, normative, and continuance commitment (Cooper-Hakim and Viswesvaran, 2005).

Nonetheless, researchers typically conceptualize commitment in terms of three dimensions: affective, continuance, and normative (Allen and Meyer, 1990). …

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