Grandmasters of Fake News

By Buchanan, Patrick J. | The American Conservative, January-February 2017 | Go to article overview

Grandmasters of Fake News


Buchanan, Patrick J., The American Conservative


"I have in my possession a secret map, made in Germany by Hitler's government--by planners of the New World Order," FDR told the nation in his Navy Day radio address of October 27, 1941. He added, "It is a map of South America as Hitler proposes to reorganize it. The geographical experts of Berlin, however, have ruthlessly obliterated all the existing boundary lines, bringing the whole continent under their domination.... This map makes clear the Nazi design not only against South America but against the United States as well."

FDR had another terrifying secret document, "a plan to abolish all existing religions--Protestant, Catholic, Mohammedan, Hindu, Buddhist and Jewish alike. ... In the place of the churches of our civilization, there is to be set up an international Nazi Church. ... A god of blood and iron will take the place of the God of love and mercy."

The source of these astounding Nazi plans?

They were forgeries by British agents in New York operating under William Stephenson, Churchill's "Man Called Intrepid," whose assignment was to do everything necessary to bring the U.S. into Britain's war.

FDR began his address by describing two German submarine attacks on U.S. destroyers Greer and Kearny, the latter of which had been torpedoed with a loss of 11 American lives.

Said FDR: "We have wished to avoid shooting. But the shooting has started. And history has recorded who fired the first shot."

The truth: Greer and Kearny had been tracking German subs for British planes dropping depth charges.

It was FDR who desperately wanted war with Germany. Hitler, for all his crimes, desperately wanted to avoid war with the United States.

Said Rep. Clare Boothe Luce, FDR "lied us into war because he did not have the political courage to lead us into it."

By late 1941, most Americans still wanted to avoid war. They believed "lying British propaganda" about Belgian babies tossed around on German bayonets had sucked us into World War I, from which the British Empire had benefited mightily.

What brings these episodes to mind is the wave of indignation sweeping Washington over "fake news" allegedly created by Vladimir Putins old KGB comrades and regurgitated by U.S. individuals, websites, and magazines that are anti-interventionist and anti-war.

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman says the "propaganda and disinformation threat" is real, and we must "counter and combat it. …

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