Fidel Castro: Death of a Murderous, Communist Dictator

The New American, December 19, 2016 | Go to article overview

Fidel Castro: Death of a Murderous, Communist Dictator


Fidel Castro died November 25 at the age of 90, but the communist tyranny he imposed on the Cuban people lives on. Unfortunately, much of the American media is trying to bury the truth about his murderous regime--and those in America who helped Castro come to power--with him.

In its coverage of Castro's passing, the increasingly discredited mainstream media is downplaying or ignoring Castro's crimes against humanity--and generally refers to him as the "former Cuban leader," as opposed to a dictator, which he was. He was also a mass murderer, and his brutal oppression of the Cuban people caused many of his fellow citizens to risk their lives to flee their island homeland on rafts and whatever else might float.

News of the death of the tyrant touched off celebrations in Miami's Little Havana in South Florida.

Despite the glossing over of inconvenient facts about the Castro brothers--Fidel and his younger brother, Raul, who currently holds power--by most of the American media, the Cuban community of exiles in Miami knows the truth. That is why they or their ancestors fled their Cuban homeland at some point since the Castros' seizure of power in 1959.

Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz was born August 13, 1926, the son of a Spanish immigrant who was a sugar plantation owner. Contrary to the belief that communism is a product of the "exploited" working class, Castro was not drawn to the ideology of Marx and Lenin by toiling in the cane fields. He was introduced to the ideas of communism while a student at the University of Havana, where he received a social science degree.

In 1953, the Castro brothers joined with others in an attack on a military barracks in Santiago. The attack failed, and the brothers wound up in prison, only to be eventually pardoned. Fleeing to Mexico, they brought together rebels and returned in 1956, organizing a guerilla band in the mountains of the eastern Sierra Maestra.

By January of 1959, Castro led his victorious rebels into the streets of Havana, where he established a new government. Fulgencio Batista, who had ruled Cuba for several years, had shortly before fled the country.

Castro's improbable taking of absolute power is largely the result of media reports by the New York Times and machinations by the U.S. State Department under President Dwight Eisenhower. Speaking before the U.S. Senate in 1960, U.S. Ambassador to Cuba Earl Smith said, "Without the United States, Castro would not be in power today. …

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