New Zealand-India Relations: A Step Forward

By Sharma, Ashok | New Zealand International Review, January-February 2017 | Go to article overview

New Zealand-India Relations: A Step Forward


Sharma, Ashok, New Zealand International Review


Today India is the fastest growing major economy in the world. And with its growing economic, military and political influence, it has emerged as a major player in the international system. After staying on the periphery of international politics for decades, India is now attracting global attention. Having begun to realise its potential as a significant power, it is no longer a mere observer of the actions of other global players. Over the past two decades, India has taken resolute steps to look outward and engage with the world on the economic, strategic and political fronts.

Without the burden of Cold War era ideological baggage, India has sought to exploit the most flexible international context to have prevailed in the past two decades. It has adopted a deliberate policy of engaging and enhancing bilateral ties with all the key global players. In doing so, New Delhi has taken a more pragmatic approach to its foreign policy and, while retaining its strategic autonomy, has moved closer to the US-led 'Political West'. But one of the striking features of its external engagement has been increasing economic, political and strategic engagement with the Asia-Pacific region/Indo-Pacific region, a process that began in the 1990s as India's 'Look East Policy'.

Now this eastward engagement is being pursued more actively under Narendra Modi's government as an 'Act East Policy'. The Modi-led Bharatiya Janata Party came to power with a thumping majority in the 2014 general election on the promise of fixing the economy and achieving for India 'a rightful place in the world'. In pursuit of that, an economics-driven foreign policy has become the hallmark of Modi's administration. This is evident in his high-profile, well-choreographed foreign visits, which have seen him cutting trade and energy deals as well as deepening defence and security ties with likeminded countries.

However, despite Modi's numerous overseas visits and his focus on economic engagement, India-New Zealand relations have not been able to achieve any momentum. This notwithstanding the fact that both nations share many common factors, such as their Commonwealth legacy, values and principles of democracy; diffusion of liberal political and economic values; the presence of a sizeable Indian diaspora; and contributions to the global commons, such as protection of both sea lanes of communication and the rules-based international order. (1)

Positive developments

Despite positive developments in the last two decades, the overall New Zealand-India bilateral relationship remains underachieved. In recent years, mutual efforts to enhance that relationship have focused on trade, tourism, education, leveraging the Indian diaspora's potential as a bridge between the two nations and on-going free trade negotiations. However, the progress on the much talked about free trade agreement has been slow, and strikingly New Zealand has so far been missing from Modi's foreign policy radar. Modi is widely recognised as having an active foreign policy agenda, as evident in his record number of overseas visits. Notably, New Zealand was not on the itinerary during his last sortie to the region, in 2014, when he visited Australia and Fiji, clearly suggesting that strategic interests took priority over economic interests in the region. Despite missed opportunities, the two countries' prime ministers have met several times on the sidelines of international forums. Moreover, during Modi's incumbency an Indian president, Shree Pranab Mukherjee, for the first time made a state visit to New Zealand.

John Key's visit to India from 24-27 October 2016 is a positive step that will give much-needed momentum to the New Zealand--India relations. It follows his previous visit in 2011. A high-level business delegation, trade negotiators and parliamentarians accompanied him. During his meeting with Modi, Key touched on a range of issues affecting bilateral relations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

New Zealand-India Relations: A Step Forward
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.