Ecowas Lesson for SADC? West African States Have Intervened to Force out the Gambia's Yahya Jammeh. Can Grouping Do the Same on Dictators Hanging on to Power in the Region, Ask Chris Saunders and Henning Melber

Cape Times (South Africa), January 30, 2017 | Go to article overview

Ecowas Lesson for SADC? West African States Have Intervened to Force out the Gambia's Yahya Jammeh. Can Grouping Do the Same on Dictators Hanging on to Power in the Region, Ask Chris Saunders and Henning Melber


Has the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) just taught the Southern African Development Community (SADC) a lesson? The West African states effectively took a dictator to task after he refused to comply with the democratic will of the people to vacate office.

By using diplomacy in combination with the threat of military force, they managed to convince former Gambian president Yahya Jammeh to surrender power and leave the country. This was after he was defeated in an election.

Why has the southern African regional body been, in comparison, so ineffectual? Will it learn from Ecowas and become more interventionist?

Many countries in southern Africa have not had free and fair elections - Zimbabwe is the most obvious example.

Where there have been cases of unconstitutional seizures of power, or leaders have stayed in office despite a lack of electoral support, there has been at best some form of SADC mediation, but not the threat of military intervention.

Such contrasting relative tolerance, if not outright passivity, can be explained by a number of factors. They relate in part to the sub-regional configuration, with former liberation movements governing the most influential member states.

In addition, there appears to be a lack of common political will. This can be seen from the fact that there is no operational regional military force.

SADC's credibility is at stake. At a time when the AU is increasingly promoting legitimate governance, the question arises: how much longer can SADC justify its inaction?

The Anglophone member states of Ecowas formed a military force - the Ecowas Ceasefire Monitoring Group - in 1990. It has intervened in a number of civil wars and cases of instability in West Africa.

SADC, on the other hand, has for years been attempting to organise a stand-by force which would fall under the stand-by force of the AU. But the SADC force isn't operational and has not got beyond basic training exercises. Units of the SANDF have been deployed for peace-making missions on behalf of the AU and the UN in a number of African countries.

A disastrous military engagement in the Central African Republic cost the lives of 13 South African soldiers in March 2013. South African troops remain in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), a SADC member state.

Soldiers have been killed there too.

It cannot be said that southern Africa has not experienced the kind of civil wars that West Africa has had in recent decades, and that there has therefore not been the need for such a force in the region.

The war in the DRC has been far larger than those in Liberia and Sierra Leone where the East African regional force intervened. And there have been a number of other cases of instability where a SADC force might well have played a role in bringing about legitimate governance, including Madagascar and Zimbabwe.

The only case that somewhat resembled events around The Gambia was South Africa's intervention in Lesotho in September 1998. Nominally under SADC, that intervention's goal was to ensure the incumbent ruler was not ousted by opposition forces.

Three SADC member states did intervene militarily in the DRC in August 1998. Troops from Angola, Namibia and Zimbabwe were deployed, nominally under the umbrella of SADC.

The goal was to aid the then president, Laurent Desire Kabila, against rebels who had invaded the eastern Congo. …

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