THE TRUTH ABOUT US AND ALCOHOL Mind over Matter

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), January 30, 2017 | Go to article overview

THE TRUTH ABOUT US AND ALCOHOL Mind over Matter


Byline: WITH DR ELLIE MILBY

IT'S often said "in vino veritas" or literally translated "in wine, truth". Many of us will be able to relate to this sentiment. Perhaps you've had one too many on a night out and woken up to feelings of regret about what was said the night before.

Or worse still, found that something you said while under the influence landed you in serious trouble. But is it really the case that we are more likely to tell the truth after a few drinks? Well, yes. Sort of.

ALCOHOL depresses of the brain that decision making Alcohol isn't some sort of magic truth serum, however, the way it affects our brains can make us more likely to reveal thoughts and feelings that we would otherwise keep to ourselves. Alcohol directly affects our brains' communication pathways by interfering with different neurotransmitters - the chemical messengers that control our thoughts, feelings and behaviours.

While this process is a complicated one that is not fully understood, unfortunately it seems that, unlike rum and coke, alcohol and neurotransmitters do not mix too well. Alcohol is often described as a depressant. This doesn't mean that drinking alcohol will make you depressed (although there is a relationship between the two) but actually refers to the way alcohol slows down various brain processes. …

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