ON THIS DAY February 2, 2017

Daily Mail (London), February 2, 2017 | Go to article overview

ON THIS DAY February 2, 2017


FROM THE DAILY MAIL ARCHIVE FEBRUARY 2, 1957 KING SAUD, the oil-rich ruler of Saudi Arabia, today placed an order for 60 jewelencrusted Cadillacs, costing over a million dollars -- the most fantastic and most secret order ever placed with Detroit's giant General Motors Corporation. A company spokesman said: 'We are not even allowed to admit these cars are even being built.'

FEBRUARY 2, 1967 WHILE Bob Monkhouse was happily entertaining white-only audiences in South Africa, his 12-year-old son Simon was literally making a stand against the colour bar. On a bus in Cape Town coloured people were standing because the only empty seats were for whites. The conductor showed Simon to a seat. 'No thanks,' said Simon. 'I'd rather stand.' The comedian's wife Elizabeth said: 'I was proud of him.'

HAPPY BIRTHDAY SHAKIRA, 40. The Colombian singer-songwriter (right) is famous for hits including Hips Don't Lie and Waka Waka (This Time for Africa), which in 2010 became the biggest-selling official World Cup song ever. Despite having once been refused a place in a school choir because a teacher said she 'sounded like a goat', she secured a record contract at 13 after discovering a Sony executive was in town and singing to him at his hotel.

KEN BRUCE, 66. The Scot is the longestserving male broadcaster in the history of Radio 2. Thought to earn more than PS200,000 a year, he declines a daily taxi from his Oxfordshire home to the BBC studio in London and takes the train instead.

BORN ON THIS DAY JAMES JOYCE (1882-1941). The Irish novelist and poet is best known for his novel Ulysses, which was published on this day in 1922, his 40th birthday. …

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