Bare Breasts, Burkini Bans and Europe's Last Blairite: Can Manuel Vails Win the French Presidency?

By Bush, Stephen | New Statesman (1996), December 9, 2016 | Go to article overview

Bare Breasts, Burkini Bans and Europe's Last Blairite: Can Manuel Vails Win the French Presidency?


Bush, Stephen, New Statesman (1996)


The election of Francois Hollande as the president of France in 2012 coincided with the highwater mark of Ed Miliband's leadership of the Labour Party. That year, Labour posted its best local election results in 17 years, gaining 823 councillors and winning control of 32 councils in a performance that has not yet been surpassed or equalled.

Gazing across the Channel, the Milibandites were given hope. Hollande showed that a wonkish career politician could triumph over a charismatic centre-right incumbent.

The UK's shattered Blairites looked to a different star rising in French politics: Manuel Valls. At the time of Hollande's victory, Vails was the mayor of Evry, a small suburb of Paris, where he made a name for himself by campaigning against halal supermarkets.

His father, Xavier, was a Spanish painter and his mother, Luisangela, was Swiss-Italian. They met and married in Paris, and Vails was born in Barcelona while the couple were on holiday.

In 2009 Vails urged the Parti Socialiste (PS) to drop the adjective "socialist" from its name, and he ran for the presidential nomination two years later on what he described as a Blairiste platform. This included scrapping the 35-hour working week, which hardly applies outside of big business and the public sector but carries symbolic weight for the French left. Valls's programme found few supporters and he came fifth in a field of six, with just 6 per cent of the vote.

Yet this was enough to earn him the post of interior minister under Hollande. While Valls's boss quickly fell from favour--within six months Hollande's approval ratings had dropped to 36 per cent, thanks to a budget that combined tax rises with deep spending cuts--his own popularity soared.

He may have run as an heir to Blair but his popularity in France benefited from a series of remarks that were closer in tone to Ukip's Nigel Farage. When he said that most Romany gypsies should be sent "back to the borders", he was condemned by both his activists and Amnesty International. Yet it also boosted his approval ratings.

One of the facets of French politics that reliably confuse outsiders is how anti-Islamic sentiment is common across the left-right divide. Direct comparisons with the ideological terrain of Westminster politics are often unhelpful. For instance, Vails supported the attempt to ban the burkini, saying in August, "Marianne [the French symbol] has a naked breast because she is feeding the people! She is not veiled, because she is free! That is the republic!"

By the spring of 20x4, he was still frequently topping the charts--at least in terms of personal appeal. A survey for French Elle found that 20 per cent of women would like to have "a torrid affair" with the lantern-jawed minister, something that pleased his second wife, Anne Gravoin, who pronounced herself "delighted" with the poll. …

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