Why the North Korea Threat Is Greatly Exaggerated; the White House Is Warning Donald Trump That North Korea Is America's Biggest Foreign Policy Problem, Which Is Absurd

By Powell, Bill | Newsweek, December 30, 2016 | Go to article overview

Why the North Korea Threat Is Greatly Exaggerated; the White House Is Warning Donald Trump That North Korea Is America's Biggest Foreign Policy Problem, Which Is Absurd


Powell, Bill, Newsweek


Byline: Bill Powell

As President Barack Obama prepares to leave office, consider the world he has left us.

In Syria, Bashar al-Assad's regime--backed by Iran and Russia--is finishing a savage bombing campaign to retake Aleppo. Tens of thousands have been killed, hundreds of thousands have been exiled and an entire generation of Sunni Arabs in the country have been embittered.

An administration whose members once touted a doctrine called the "responsibility to protect," now silently watches a genocide, evidently believing that U.S. intervention would somehow make the situation worse, and probably threaten what this president views as his prized foreign policy trophy: an agreement with Iran that purportedly restrains that regime's nuclear weapons program, at least for a while.

The Islamic State militant group, also known as ISIS, meanwhile, recaptured the Syrian city of Palmyra--which had fallen months ago--and oh yes, Al-Qaeda has never had more of a presence in more countries than it does today, despite the administration's claims to the contrary.

Then there's Russia. In addition to restoring its influence in the Middle East, Moscow, has lopped off Crimea in Ukraine, and the Council on Foreign Relations now posits that the possibility of a NATO-Russia confrontation is as high as it has been since the end of the Cold War.

And finally, on December 15, Beijing announced it has deployed powerful anti-aircraft and anti-missile systems to all seven of its new artificial islands in the Spratly archipelago $5 trillion in trade annually. Then China seized a U.S. submersible drone operating in international waters in the South China Sea, only to agree to return it two days later.

Given that litany of debacles abroad, it might surprise you to learn the Obama administration is telling the Trump crowd that the biggest foreign policy issue the incoming president will face is North Korea.

Where to begin? Let's start with how this administration's policy in dealing with Pyongyang has been called "strategic patience." As The Wall Street Journal put it recently, Obama has refused to engage his administration in high-level negotiations with North Korea, waiting for its leader, Kim Jong Un, show he is committed to abandoning his nuclear arsenal.

I've only been to North Korea twice, but I am certain Kim is never going to voluntarily abandon his nuclear arsenal. Why? Because it's all he's got. It's the only thing standing between him and a job as a body double for the guy who plays him in the sequel to The Interview. Kim, in his own way, kept telling us this, too--with a series of tests of his nukes and ballistic missiles. The administration begged, pleaded and cajoled China to do something to rein him in, much as the Bush administration did previously. And Beijing never did--at least not to a meaningful extent--because China is content with the status quo: It likes a divided Korean peninsula rather than one that's unified, prosperous and democratic. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Why the North Korea Threat Is Greatly Exaggerated; the White House Is Warning Donald Trump That North Korea Is America's Biggest Foreign Policy Problem, Which Is Absurd
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.