Putting Us in the Picture; SOCIAL MEDIA BID TO HIGHLIGHT WORK OF ACCLAIMED SNAPPERLong-Time Friend of Charity Founder and Documentary Photographer Franki Raffles Reveals Some of Her Most Striking Images of Women Going about Their Lives around the World

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), February 6, 2017 | Go to article overview

Putting Us in the Picture; SOCIAL MEDIA BID TO HIGHLIGHT WORK OF ACCLAIMED SNAPPERLong-Time Friend of Charity Founder and Documentary Photographer Franki Raffles Reveals Some of Her Most Striking Images of Women Going about Their Lives around the World


Byline: reporters@dailyrecord.co.uk JENNY MORRISON

SHE'S best remembered as one of the founders of the charity Zero Tolerance.

Now, more than 20 years after her tragic early death, an exhibition will showcase the powerful work of social documentary photographer Franki Raffles.

Edinburgh-based Franki was making a name for herself as a respected campaigning, feminist photographer, when she died in December 1994, aged just 39, as a result of complications from giving birth to twin girls.

She travelled the world photographing women at work and in their everyday lives, aiming to show their resilience, dignity and strength.

Friend Alistair Scott, director of Screen Academy life a lens Raffles Scotland and associate professor of film and television at Edinburgh Napier University, created a website archive about the artist he met during their time as students in St Andrews.

With the support of Franki's partner Sandy and their five children, he has helped oversee than 90,000 of her images which have been gifted by her estate to St Andrews University.

Now a selection of them are set to go on display at the Glasgow School of Art, in an exhibition curated by GSA exhibitions director Jenny Brownrigg - Observing Women at Work, Franki Raffles.

Dr Scott said: "Franki always looked beyond the edge of the photograph - to what each image told us about society.

"She was deeply interested in women's lives - that was the focus of her attention - and these women could be living in Russia, China or just around the corner. The issues she dealt with - the role of women, identity, gender, migration - are still so pertinent today.

"But there was a danger that because of when she died, in the days before photographers had websites or people could see their work online, that her work may be forgotten."

Researchers at St Andrews University are now working to digitalise Franki's images as part of their Franki Raffles Photographic Collection.

Dr Scott added: "Franki's family have put the whole of her work into this special collection at St Andrews University so that people can access it and see the contribution she made."

?View the Franki Raffles archive on www.frankirafflesarchive.org WORK WAS PIONEERING "WOMEN Workers is a project in which Franki documented the lives of women in the USSR during the final months of communism.

"In the summer of 1989, she spent three months in three Soviet republics, Russia, Georgia, and the Ukraine.

"This work, recording women's lives as the Soviet system was about to collapse, can viewed alongside the work of pioneer women social documentary photographers, such as Margaret Bourke-White, who were among the first to document life under communist rule 60 years earlier."

be RAISING ABUSE AWARENESS "ZERO Tolerance was a charity established by Franki and Evelyn Gillan, together with a group of women who came together through working on Edinburgh District Council Women's Committee projects in the late 80s. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Putting Us in the Picture; SOCIAL MEDIA BID TO HIGHLIGHT WORK OF ACCLAIMED SNAPPERLong-Time Friend of Charity Founder and Documentary Photographer Franki Raffles Reveals Some of Her Most Striking Images of Women Going about Their Lives around the World
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.