Transfer Trailblazers: Taking Articulation Agreements between Community Colleges and Four-Year Institutions to the Next Level with a Focus on Pre- and Post-Transfer Success

By Loveland, Elaina | University Business, March 2017 | Go to article overview

Transfer Trailblazers: Taking Articulation Agreements between Community Colleges and Four-Year Institutions to the Next Level with a Focus on Pre- and Post-Transfer Success


Loveland, Elaina, University Business


Kate Wing, a senior at Smith College, will soon join the 14 percent. That is, the 14 percent of students who started their postsecondary education in a community college, then transferred to a four-year school and earned a bachelors degree within six years of entry.

"In general the pathways to transfer are not clear, and universities and colleges don't often do much about it, but that is changing," says Davis Jenkins, senior research associate at the Community College Research Center at Columbia University. Jenkins unveiled the 14 percent statistic in his 2016 report, "Tracking Transfer: New Measures of Institutional and State Effectiveness in Helping Community College Students Attain Bachelors Degrees."

Successful transfer articulation agreements "go well beyond just a paper transfer agreement," says Jenkins. "Doing these relationships well is expensive. Institutions have to pay for advisors to go to community colleges, for example. It makes sense for colleges to build relationships with other institutions close to them." Smith College's Ada Comstock Scholars program for non-traditional women (age 24 and over, veterans or women with dependents) is a long-term initiative that has seen nearly 2,200 transfer students complete a bachelor's degree at the women's college in Massachusetts.

Sidonia Dalby, associate director of admission and Ada Comstock advisor, recruits students from community colleges throughout the United States. In addition, since the mid-1990s Smith has had articulation agreements with several institutions, including Greenfield Community College and Holyoke Community College in Massachusetts, Miami Dade College, and Santa Monica College in California.

"Smith is very committed to access and some of our strongest students enter the college from community colleges," says Dalby. "One Ada just completed a Fulbright year in Indonesia, another is in graduate school at Harvard and a single mom who graduated in May is in law school at the University of California, Berkeley."

Dalby has tight relationships with people she calls "transfer champions" at community colleges to help steer students toward a successful transfer to Smith. "They could be a staff member dedicated to serving transfer students or a faculty member committed to their student's success. Transfer champions are vital part of relationship-building and keeping articulation agreements alive."

A few other ways higher ed institutions take transfer agreements to the next level involve offering access to the four-year school early, ensuring the pathway is very clear from the get-go, and recognizing the need to cut through student financial barriers to completion.

Boosting campus integration opportunities

Advisors at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania often work with students who aren't even students there--yet. Tara Vasold Fischer, associate dean of academic advising and college dean/coordinator of Dickinson's Community College Partnership Program, says there's almost a two-year relationship before a student even applies to Dickinson.

The program prepares full-time, highly motivated honors students from four community colleges for transfer.

Fischer works closely with community college advisors to identify transfer prospects as soon as they start taking classes at the community college. Then she'll have one-on-one conversations--over the phone or in person--with students who express interest in transferring to Dickinson. "It enables us to do more long-term curricular planning with them and they have a clear view about what their time at Dickinson would look like," says Fischer. "It is not just about the academic experience. We take a lot of time to connect students with information and contacts they need for the social transition to be smooth."

Dickinson launched the program in 2008-09 and has relationships in place with four community colleges: Howard Community College and Montgomery College in Maryland, and Montgomery County and Northampton community colleges in Pennsylvania. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Transfer Trailblazers: Taking Articulation Agreements between Community Colleges and Four-Year Institutions to the Next Level with a Focus on Pre- and Post-Transfer Success
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.