Finding Trump's Refugee Policy: Will Christians Be Prioritized?

By Kamal, Maha | The Humanist, March-April 2017 | Go to article overview

Finding Trump's Refugee Policy: Will Christians Be Prioritized?


Kamal, Maha, The Humanist


Over the last weekend of January, Donald Trump screened his very first movie at the White House Family Theater: Finding Dory. He sat in the bright red presidents armchair watching an animated story about a forgetful Australian fish who, with the help of her underwater friends, reunites with her parents by illegally entering the United States by way of Morro Bay, California.

Meanwhile, outside the theater protesters gathered across the country at major US airports.

On January 27, 2017, Trump issued his executive order, "Protecting The Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into The United States." The order effectively banned the entrance of non-US citizens from seven countries: Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Iran, Somalia, Libya, and Yemen. Refugees, too, were banned for a 120-day period. Trumps order caused immediate national uproar, resulting in weekend chaos and confusion as international travelers were detained at US checkpoints or their flights were diverted out of the United States. Regarding the reinstatement of the Refugee Admissions Program after 120 days, the order made a peculiar note:

   [T]he Secretary of State, in consultation
   with the Secretary of Homeland
   Security, is further directed to
   make changes, to the extent permitted
   by law, to prioritize refugee
   claims made by individuals on the
   basis of religious-based persecution,
   provided that the religion of
   the individual is a minority religion
   in the individual's country
   of nationality. Where necessary
   and appropriate, the Secretaries
   of State and Homeland Security
   shall recommend legislation to the
   President that would assist with
   such prioritization.

While the order itself did not suggest prioritization of Christian refugees, it goes without saying that Christianity is a minority religion in all seven of the majority-Muslim countries listed for exclusion from travel. In response to concerns about religious discrimination in his executive order, Trump stated, "If you were a Muslim you could come in, but if you were a Christian, it was almost impossible and the reason that was so unfair--everybody was persecuted, in all fairness--but they were chopping off the heads of everybody but more so the Christians. And I thought it was very, very unfair. So we are going to help them."

After a lawsuit was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, a federal court issued an emergency stay temporarily prohibiting the enforcement of the executive order. "There is imminent danger that, absent the stay of removal, there will be substantial and irreparable injury to refugees, visa-holders, and other individuals from nations such to the January 27, 2017, executive order," District Court Judge Ann Donnelly wrote in her order granting the stay.

Judge Donnelly's orders echo a history of protecting refugees under international law. While refugees have arguably existed for as long as human civilization, an international commitment to protecting the rights of refugees is relatively recent. Following the end of World War II, which displaced millions throughout Europe, there came a need for international recognition and cooperation for the rights of refugees. This was first addressed in Article Fourteen of the 1948 UN Declaration of Human Rights, which states: "Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution." The article prompted the establishment of the High Commissioner for Refugees in 1949, headed by the United States. It also led to the birth of the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees two years later.

The convention takes an unequivocal stance on the rights of persons seeking asylum in other countries and tasks the UN High Commissioner for Refugees with enforcing it. More significantly, it explicitly defines the refugee: one who is outside his or her country of origin and cannot return for fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Finding Trump's Refugee Policy: Will Christians Be Prioritized?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.