School Spotlight: St. Louis Community College

By Reese, Susan | Techniques, March 2017 | Go to article overview

School Spotlight: St. Louis Community College


Reese, Susan, Techniques


ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE (STLCC) IS THE LARGEST COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT IN Missouri and one of the largest in the United States. It has served the community since the 1960s, and the school notes that today, more than half the households in the St. Louis area include at least one person who has attended the school.

At its multiple campuses and workforce and education centers, STLCC currently serves more than 69,000 students annually, offering 15 college-transfer programs and nearly 100 career programs. Both options have provided pathways to success for students, as more than 80 percent of STLCC career and technical graduates are employed in their fields or continuing their education at four-year institutions within six months of graduation. In addition, the school notes that it sends more transfer students to four-year Missouri colleges and universities than any other college in the state.

Career and technical education (CTE) at STLCC is dynamic and thriving at its four centers of excellence: the Center for Emerging and Advanced Information Technologies; the Digital Arts and Technology Alliance; the Emerson Center for Engineering and Manufacturing; and the Center for Plant and Life Sciences. High school students benefit through options such as Project Lead the Way, dual credit and articulated credit.

The Interior Design program, which is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design, is part of the CTE department at STLCC, and students can earn an associate in Applied Science, as well as an optional certificate of proficiency in Kitchen and Bath Design. In addition, STLCC's program is the only one in the St. Louis region accredited by the National Kitchen and Bath Association.

The 66-credit-hour associate degree program includes general education courses in college composition, report writing, psychology and science/math. The career concentration courses include two courses in design and four in interior design, as well as Art History II and History of Cultural Environments I and II. Among the other courses are Architectural Graphics, Computer-aided Interior Design, and Building Systems and Construction for Interior Designers. …

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