How Geert Wilders Lost Power but Gained Influence in the Netherlands; Populists Helped Move the Nation's Mainstream Parties to the Right and Transformed Political Norms despite Falling Short at the Polls

By Lowe, Josh | Newsweek, March 31, 2017 | Go to article overview

How Geert Wilders Lost Power but Gained Influence in the Netherlands; Populists Helped Move the Nation's Mainstream Parties to the Right and Transformed Political Norms despite Falling Short at the Polls


Lowe, Josh, Newsweek


Byline: Josh Lowe

As results flooded in after the Dutch general election, incumbent Prime Minister Mark Rutte was beaming.

The country, he said, had hit back against far-right, anti-Islam politician Geert Wilders and the hate he espoused. Wilders's Party for Freedom came a distant second, with 20 seats, to Rutte's People's Party for Freedom and Democracy, which won 33. "The Netherlands said: 'Whoa!' to the wrong kind of populism," Rutte told supporters at a rally. Headlines proclaimed that, despite the nativist insurgencies of 2016, the Dutch had rallied in support of the liberal center.

RELATED: What you need to know about the Dutch election results

But the truth is not that simple. Wilders is out of power, but his influence is everywhere. He has shown how populists can transform political norms, even when they lose. Rutte's party responded to rising populism in the Netherlands by toughening its stance on immigration. Case in point: During the campaign, Rutte took out an ad in a Dutch paper that urged migrants in the Netherlands to "be normal or go away."

Meanwhile, the center-right Christian Democratic Appeal party, which took joint third place with 19 seats, campaigned on a nationalist, socially conservative platform. Unlike Wilders, the Christian Democrats support EU membership, and the party believes Muslims should be free to practice their religion. But it has called for Dutch Turks with passports from both countries to give up the Turkish ones, and backs symbolic initiatives like introducing singing the national anthem in schools--a dramatic move in the Netherlands, which wouldn't normally go in for such forthright patriotism.

Elsewhere in Europe, candidates facing their own populist challengers will consider whether they too should move to the right. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

How Geert Wilders Lost Power but Gained Influence in the Netherlands; Populists Helped Move the Nation's Mainstream Parties to the Right and Transformed Political Norms despite Falling Short at the Polls
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.