Ulster Missionary Doctor Who Left Lasting Impression in Manchuria

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), March 27, 2017 | Go to article overview

Ulster Missionary Doctor Who Left Lasting Impression in Manchuria


Local historian Gordon Lucy marks the centenary of the death of Isabel Deane (Ida) Mitchell, a Presbyterian missionary in Manchuria and a nurse whose name was 'known and revered through all of China' according to an elder who spoke at her funeral in 1917 after her death at the age of 38

When the Presbyterian Church in Ireland sent Dr Joseph Hunter and Elizabeth Jayne Smyth, his wife, to China in 1869 it marked the beginning of a sustained missionary effort in Manchuria.

Between 1869 and 1951 a total of 91 Irish Presbyterian missionaries worked in Manchuria, 31 were ordained, 49 were female and 25 were medically qualified.

They cooperated closely with missionaries from the United Free Church of Scotland and the Danish Lutheran Church.

Despite many trials and tribulations the efforts of these Presbyterian Church in Ireland (PCI) missionaries continue to bear fruit to this day.

Today, the Christian Church is growing faster in China than anywhere else in the world and there may be as many as 150 million Christians in the country.

Many of the congregations started by PCI missionaries are now flourishing with, in some cases, membership numbering several thousands.

One of those missionaries who made a significant difference in China was Isabel Mitchell.

Born in 1879, she was the daughter of the Rev DK Mitchell, the minister of Crumlin Road Presbyterian Church, and his Scottish-born wife.

Isabel (Ida to her family) grew up in a home which predisposed her to a life devoted to evangelical outreach.

David, her brother, became a minister and served as a chaplain with the 36th (Ulster) Division during the Great War.

Her sister Janie married a missionary and another sister married a local clergyman.

In 1897, just before she was about to go to university, Ida heard Mrs Sara Greig, wife of Dr James Greig, a PCI medical missionary who served in Manchuria between 1889 and 1926, give a talk about missionary work in that country.

The lecture had a profound impact on Ida and inspired her to study medicine and to go to China as a medical missionary.

After a faltering start, Ida graduated from Glasgow University in July 1903, having won four medals and two prizes during the course of her university career.

The Russo-Japanese War of 1904-5 delayed her departure to Manchuria but during this period she worked as a house-surgeon in Manchester.

On November 12 1905 she arrived in Fukumen where she worked alongside the Rev and Mrs Fred O'Neill and Miss Sara McWilliams.

Ida was instrumental in opening a new women's hospital in Fukumen which opened on October 16 1909.

Annie O'Neill, a granddaughter of the Rev and Mrs Fred O'Neill, described it as "the first modern hospital" in Fukumen. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Ulster Missionary Doctor Who Left Lasting Impression in Manchuria
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.