Am I Daft for Loving This Fickle Woman? the Angel That Presides O'er My Birth Said, 'Little Creature, Formed of Joy and Mirth, Go Love without the Help of Anything on Earth.' WILLIAM BLAKE (ENGLISH POET AND ARTIST, 1757-1827)

Daily Mail (London), March 29, 2017 | Go to article overview

Am I Daft for Loving This Fickle Woman? the Angel That Presides O'er My Birth Said, 'Little Creature, Formed of Joy and Mirth, Go Love without the Help of Anything on Earth.' WILLIAM BLAKE (ENGLISH POET AND ARTIST, 1757-1827)


Byline: BEL MOONEY

DEAR BEL ABOUT a year after a messy divorce and financial settlement in my ex's favour, I fell for a widow. Six months later, her daughter began a series of abusive phone calls that lasted 18 months. My partner defended her daughter and left me several times over the ensuing rows but came back.

When her daughter died, her granddaughter inherited the house. One day, I went there, by invitation, and got thrown out for waking her up at NOON! Another row ensued, my partner moved out then back in again. This has happened nine times in 15 years and on the last occasion, I warned her if she ever threatened me again, that would be it. For nine months I've not been sleeping properly (prostate trouble). My partner moved out on the day of my prostate consultant appointment because I've been 'surly and uncommunicative' and because I refused to marry her.

She knows I haven't proposed for historical reasons. For 15 years I've supported her and even loaned her a lot of money to refurbish her house prior to sale and downsizing. Now she's planning on giving her house to her feckless son. If we married, divorce could follow with another financial settlement and I'd be on the street at 80. To marry under such circumstances would be insane. I feel ashamed of my own stupidity because I still love her and I am left alone. Advice? BARRY SOMETIMES, dear sir, I reach the end of a screed of unhappiness like yours, then see the dreaded 'L' word and want to run screaming with frustration until I have no voice left.

Do you know what I mean? I think you do, because of the words that start your last paragraph. But isn't it time to stop feeling 'pathetic and ashamed' and do something about your life? If you'd written, 'Dear Bel, I keep smashing my head against the wall and trying to see through the blood do you think I'll feel better if I stop? …

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Am I Daft for Loving This Fickle Woman? the Angel That Presides O'er My Birth Said, 'Little Creature, Formed of Joy and Mirth, Go Love without the Help of Anything on Earth.' WILLIAM BLAKE (ENGLISH POET AND ARTIST, 1757-1827)
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